Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > William Penn > Fruits of Solitude
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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Caution and Conduct
 
 
118. Be not easily acquainted, lest finding Reason to cool, thou makest an Enemy instead of a good Neighbor.  1
  119. Be Reserved, but not Sour; Grave, but not Formal; Bold, but not Rash; Humble, but not Servile; Patient, not Insensible; Constant, not Obstinate; Chearful, not Light; Rather Sweet than Familiar; Familiar, than Intimate; and Intimate with very few, and upon very good Grounds.  2
  120. Return the Civilities thou receivest, and be grateful for Favors.  3
 

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