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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Respect
 
 
253. Never esteem any Man, or thy self, the more for Money; nor think the meaner of thy self or another for want of it: Vertue being the just Reason of respecting, and the want of it, of slighting any one.  1
  254. A man like a Watch, is to be valued for its Goings.  2
  255. He that prefers him upon other accounts, bows to an Idol.  3
  256. Unless Virtue guide us, our Choice must be wrong.  4
  257. An able bad Man, is an ill Instrument, and to be shunned as the Plague.  5
  258. Be not deceived with the first appearances of things, but give thy self Time to be in the right.  6
  259. Show, is not Substance: Realities Govern Wise Men.  7
  260. Have a Care therefore where there is more Sail than Ballast.  8
 

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