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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Alexander Pope. (1688–1744)
 
 
1
    Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things
To low ambition and the pride of kings.
Let us (since life can little more supply
Than just to look about us, and to die)
Expatiate free o’er all this scene of man;
A mighty maze! but not without a plan. 1
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 1.
2
    Together let us beat this ample field,
Try what the open, what the covert yield.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 9.
3
    Eye Nature’s walks, shoot folly as it flies,
And catch the manners living as they rise;
Laugh where we must, be candid where we can,
But vindicate the ways of God to man. 2
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 13.
4
    Say first, of God above or man below,
What can we reason but from what we know?
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 17.
5
    ’T is but a part we see, and not a whole.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 60.
6
    Heaven from all creatures hides the book of Fate,
All but the page prescrib’d, their present state.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 77.
7
    Pleased to the last, he crops the flowery food,
And licks the hand just raised to shed his blood.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 83.
8
    Who sees with equal eye, as God of all,
A hero perish or a sparrow fall,
Atoms or systems into ruin hurl’d,
And now a bubble burst, and now a world.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 87.
9
    Hope springs eternal in the human breast:
Man never is, but always to be blest. 3
The soul, uneasy and confined from home,
Rests and expatiates in a life to come.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 95.
10
    Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutor’d mind
Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind;
His soul proud Science never taught to stray
Far as the solar walk or milky way.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 99.
  
  
  
11
    But thinks, admitted to that equal sky,
His faithful dog shall bear him company.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 111.
12
    In pride, in reasoning pride, our error lies;
All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies.
Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes:
Men would be angels, angels would be gods.
Aspiring to be gods, if angels fell,
Aspiring to be angels, men rebel.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 123.
13
    Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise;
My footstool earth, my canopy the skies. 4
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 139.
14
    Why has not man a microscopic eye?
For this plain reason,—man is not a fly.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 193.
15
    Die of a rose in aromatic pain.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 200.
16
    The spider’s touch, how exquisitely fine!
Feels at each thread, and lives along the line. 5
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 217.
17
    Remembrance and reflection how allied!
What thin partitions sense from thought divide! 6
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 225.
18
    All are but parts of one stupendous whole,
Whose body Nature is, and God the soul.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 267.
19
    Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze,
Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees.
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 271.
20
    As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns
As the rapt seraph that adores and burns:
To Him no high, no low, no great, no small; 7
He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all!
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 277.
21
    All nature is but art, unknown to thee;
All chance, direction, which thou canst not see;
All discord, harmony not understood;
All partial evil, universal good;
And spite of pride, in erring reason’s spite,
One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right. 8
          Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 289.
22
    Know then thyself, presume not God to scan;
The proper study of mankind is man. 9
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 1.
23
    Chaos of thought and passion, all confused;
Still by himself abused or disabused;
Created half to rise, and half to fall;
Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all;
Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurled,—
The glory, jest, and riddle of the world. 10
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 13.
24
    Fix’d like a plant on his peculiar spot,
To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 63.
25
    In lazy apathy let stoics boast
Their virtue fix’d: ’t is fix’d as in a frost;
Contracted all, retiring to the breast;
But strength of mind is exercise, not rest.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 101.
26
    On life’s vast ocean diversely we sail,
Reason the card, but passion is the gale.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 107.
27
    And hence one master-passion in the breast,
Like Aaron’s serpent, swallows up the rest.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 131.
28
    The young disease, that must subdue at length,
Grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 135.
29
    Extremes in nature equal ends produce;
In man they join to some mysterious use.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 205.
30
    Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,
As to be hated needs but to be seen; 11
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 217.
31
    Ask where ’s the North? At York ’t is on the Tweed;
In Scotland at the Orcades; and there,
At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 222.
32
    Virtuous and vicious every man must be,—
Few in the extreme, but all in the degree.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 231.
33
    Hope travels through, nor quits us when we die.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 231.
34
    Behold the child, by Nature’s kindly law,
Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw;
Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight,
A little louder, but as empty quite;
Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage,
And beads and prayer-books are the toys of age.
Pleased with this bauble still, as that before,
Till tired he sleeps, and life’s poor play is o’er.
          Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 274.
35
    While man exclaims, “See all things for my use!”
“See man for mine!” replies a pamper’d goose. 12
          Essay on Man. Epistle iii. Line 45.
36
    Learn of the little nautilus to sail,
Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iii. Line 177.
37
    The enormous faith of many made for one.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iii. Line 242.
38
    For forms of government let fools contest;
Whate’er is best administer’d is best.
For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight;
His can’t be wrong whose life is in the right. 13
In faith and hope the world will disagree,
But all mankind’s concern is charity.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iii. Line 303.
39
    O happiness! our being’s end and aim!
Good, pleasure, ease, content! whate’er thy name:
That something still which prompts the eternal sigh,
For which we bear to live, or dare to die.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 1.
40
    Order is Heaven’s first law.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 49.
41
    Reason’s whole pleasure, all the joys of sense,
Lie in three words,—health, peace, and competence.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 79.
42
    The soul’s calm sunshine and the heartfelt joy.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 168.
43
    Honour and shame from no condition rise;
Act well your part, there all the honour lies.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 193.
44
    Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow;
The rest is all but leather or prunello.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 203.
45
    What can ennoble sots or slaves or cowards?
Alas! not all the blood of all the Howards.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 215.
46
    A wit ’s a feather, and a chief a rod;
An honest man ’s the noblest work of God. 14
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 247.
47
    Plays round the head, but comes not to the heart.
One self-approving hour whole years outweighs
Of stupid starers and of loud huzzas;
And more true joy Marcellus exil’d feels
Than Cæsar with a senate at his heels.
In parts superior what advantage lies?
Tell (for you can) what is it to be wise?
’T is but to know how little can be known;
To see all others’ faults, and feel our own.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 254.
48
    Truths would you teach, or save a sinking land?
All fear, none aid you, and few understand.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 261.
49
    If parts allure thee, think how Bacon shin’d,
The wisest, brightest, meanest of mankind!
Or ravish’d with the whistling of a name, 15
See Cromwell, damn’d to everlasting fame! 16
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 281.
50
    Know then this truth (enough for man to know),—
“Virtue alone is happiness below.”
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 309.
51
    Never elated when one man ’s oppress’d;
Never dejected while another ’s bless’d.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 323.
52
    Slave to no sect, who takes no private road,
But looks through Nature up to Nature’s God. 17
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 331.
53
    Form’d by thy converse, happily to steer
From grave to gay, from lively to severe. 18
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 379.
54
    Say, shall my little bark attendant sail,
Pursue the triumph and partake the gale?
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 385.
55
    Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 390.
56
    That virtue only makes our bliss below, 19
And all our knowledge is ourselves to know.
          Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 397.
57
    To observations which ourselves we make,
We grow more partial for th’ observer’s sake.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 11.
58
    Like following life through creatures you dissect,
You lose it in the moment you detect.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 20.
59
    In vain sedate reflections we would make
When half our knowledge we must snatch, not take.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 39.
60
    Not always actions show the man; we find
Who does a kindness is not therefore kind.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 109.
61
    Who combats bravely is not therefore brave,
He dreads a death-bed like the meanest slave:
Who reasons wisely is not therefore wise,—
His pride in reasoning, not in acting lies.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 115.
62
    ’T is from high life high characters are drawn;
A saint in crape is twice a saint in lawn.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 135.
63
    ’T is education forms the common mind:
Just as the twig is bent the tree ’s inclined.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 149.
64
    Manners with fortunes, humours turn with climes,
Tenets with books, and principles with times. 20
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 172.
65
    “Odious! in woollen! ’t would a saint provoke,”
Were the last words that poor Narcissa spoke.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 246.
66
    And you, brave Cobham! to the latest breath
Shall feel your ruling passion strong in death.
          Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 262.
67
    Whether the charmer sinner it or saint it,
If folly grow romantic, I must paint it.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 15.
68
    Choose a firm cloud before it fall, and in it
Catch, ere she change, the Cynthia of this minute.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 19.
69
    Fine by defect, and delicately weak. 21
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 43.
70
    With too much quickness ever to be taught;
With too much thinking to have common thought.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 97.
71
    Atossa, cursed with every granted prayer,
Childless with all her children, wants an heir;
To heirs unknown descends the unguarded store,
Or wanders heaven-directed to the poor.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 147.
72
    Virtue she finds too painful an endeavour,
Content to dwell in decencies forever.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 163.
73
    Men, some to business, some to pleasure take;
But every woman is at heart a rake.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 215.
74
    See how the world its veterans rewards!
A youth of frolics, an old age of cards.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 243.
75
    Oh, blest with temper whose unclouded ray
Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day!
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 257.
76
    Most women have no characters at all.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 258.
77
    She who ne’er answers till a husband cools,
Or if she rules him, never shows she rules.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 261.
78
    And mistress of herself though china fall.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 268.
79
    Woman ’s at best a contradiction still.
          Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 270.
80
    Who shall decide when doctors disagree,
And soundest casuists doubt, like you and me?
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 1.
81
    Blest paper-credit! last and best supply!
That lends corruption lighter wings to fly.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 39.
82
    P. What riches give us let us then inquire:
Meat, fire, and clothes. B. What more? P. Meat, fine clothes, and fire.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 79.
83
    But thousands die without or this or that,—
Die, and endow a college or a cat.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 95.
84
    The ruling passion, be it what it will,
The ruling passion conquers reason still.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 153.
85
    Extremes in Nature equal good produce;
Extremes in man concur to general use.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 161.
86
    Rise, honest muse! and sing The Man of Ross.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 250.
87
    Ye little stars! hide your diminish’d rays. 22
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 282.
88
    Who builds a church to God and not to fame,
Will never mark the marble with his name.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 285.
89
    In the worst inn’s worst room, with mat half hung.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 299.
90
    Where London’s column, pointing at the skies,
Like a tall bully, lifts the head and lies.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 339.
91
    Good sense, which only is the gift of Heaven,
And though no science, fairly worth the seven.
          Moral Essays. Epistle iv. Line 43.
92
    To rest, the cushion and soft dean invite,
Who never mentions hell to ears polite. 23
          Moral Essays. Epistle iv. Line 149.
93
    Statesman, yet friend to truth! of soul sincere,
In action faithful, and in honour clear;
Who broke no promise, serv’d no private end,
Who gain’d no title, and who lost no friend.
          Epistle to Mr. Addison. Line 67.
94
    ’T is with our judgments as our watches,—none
Go just alike, yet each believes his own. 24
          Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 9.
95
    One science only will one genius fit:
So vast is art, so narrow human wit.
          Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 60.
96
    From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part,
And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art.
          Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 152.
97
    Those oft are stratagems which errors seem,
Nor is it Homer nods, but we that dream. 25
          Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 177.
98
    Of all the causes which conspire to blind
Man’s erring judgment, and misguide the mind;
What the weak head with strongest bias rules,—
Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 1.
99
    A little learning is a dangerous thing; 26
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 15.
100
    Hills peep o’er hills, and Alps on Alps arise!
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 32.
101
    Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see,
Thinks what ne’er was, nor is, nor e’er shall be. 27
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 53.
102
    True wit is Nature to advantage dress’d,
What oft was thought, but ne’er so well express’d.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 97.
103
    Words are like leaves; and where they most abound,
Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 109.
104
    Such labour’d nothings, in so strange a style,
Amaze th’ unlearn’d and make the learned smile.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 126.
105
    In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold,
Alike fantastic if too new or old:
Be not the first by whom the new are tried,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 133.
106
    Some to church repair,
Not for the doctrine, but the music there.
These equal syllables alone require,
Though oft the ear the open vowels tire;
While expletives their feeble aid to join,
And ten low words oft creep in one dull line.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 142.
107
    A needless Alexandrine ends the song,
That like a wounded snake drags its slow length along.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 156.
108
    True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,
As those move easiest who have learn’d to dance.
’T is not enough no harshness gives offence,—
The sound must seem an echo to the sense.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 162.
109
    Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows,
And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows;
But when loud surges lash the sounding shore,
The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar.
When Ajax strives some rock’s vast weight to throw,
The line too labours, and the words move slow:
Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain,
Flies o’er th’ unbending corn, and skims along the main.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 166.
110
    Yet let not each gay turn thy rapture move;
For fools admire, but men of sense approve.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 190.
111
    But let a lord once own the happy lines,
How the wit brightens! how the style refines!
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 220.
112
    Envy will merit as its shade pursue,
But like a shadow proves the substance true.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 266.
113
    To err is human, to forgive divine. 28
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 325.
114
    All seems infected that th’ infected spy,
As all looks yellow to the jaundic’d eye.
          Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 358.
115
    And make each day a critic on the last.
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 12.
116
    Men must be taught as if you taught them not,
And things unknown propos’d as things forgot.
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 15.
117
    The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read,
With loads of learned lumber in his head.
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 53.
118
    Most authors steal their works, or buy;
Garth did not write his own Dispensary.
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 59.
119
    For fools rush in where angels fear to tread. 29
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 66.
120
    Led by the light of the Mæonian star.
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 89.
121
    Content if hence th’ unlearn’d their wants may view,
The learn’d reflect on what before they knew. 30
          Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 180.
122
    What dire offence from amorous causes springs!
What mighty contests rise from trivial things!
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto i. Line 1.
123
    And all Arabia breathes from yonder box.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto i. Line 134.
124
    On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore
Which Jews might kiss, and infidels adore.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto ii. Line 7.
125
    If to her share some female errors fall,
Look on her face, and you ’ll forget them all.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto ii. Line 17.
126
    Fair tresses man’s imperial race insnare,
And beauty draws us with a single hair. 31
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto ii. Line 27.
127
    Here thou, great Anna! whom three realms obey,
Dost sometimes counsel take—and sometimes tea.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 7.
128
    At every word a reputation dies.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 16.
129
    The hungry judges soon the sentence sign,
And wretches hang that jurymen may dine.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 21.
130
    Coffee, which makes the politician wise,
And see through all things with his half-shut eyes.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 117.
131
    The meeting points the sacred hair dissever
From the fair head, forever, and forever!
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 153.
132
    Sir Plume, of amber snuff-box justly vain,
And the nice conduct of a clouded cane.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto iv. Line 123.
133
    Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.
          The Rape of the Lock. Canto v. Line 34.
134
    Shut, shut the door, good John! fatigued, I said;
Tie up the knocker! say I ’m sick, I ’m dead.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 1.
135
    Fire in each eye, and papers in each hand,
They rave, recite, and madden round the land.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 5.
136
    E’en Sunday shines no Sabbath day to me.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 12.
137
    Is there a parson much bemused in beer,
A maudlin poetess, a rhyming peer,
A clerk foredoom’d his father’s soul to cross,
Who pens a stanza when he should engross?
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 15.
138
    Friend to my life, which did not you prolong,
The world had wanted many an idle song.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 27.
139
    Obliged by hunger and request of friends.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 44.
140
    Fired that the house rejects him, “’Sdeath! I ’ll print it,
And shame the fools.”
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 61.
141
    No creature smarts so little as a fool.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 84.
142
    Destroy his fib or sophistry—in vain!
The creature ’s at his dirty work again.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 91.
143
    As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame,
I lisp’d in numbers, for the numbers came.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 127.
144
    Pretty! in amber to observe the forms
Of hairs, or straws, or dirt, or grubs, or worms! 32
The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare,
But wonder how the devil they got there.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 169.
145
    Means not, but blunders round about a meaning;
And he whose fustian ’s so sublimely bad,
It is not poetry, but prose run mad.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 186.
146
    Should such a man, too fond to rule alone,
Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne. 33
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 197.
147
    Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer,
And without sneering teach the rest to sneer; 34
Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike,
Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 201.
148
    By flatterers besieg’d,
And so obliging that he ne’er oblig’d;
Like Cato, give his little senate laws, 35
And sit attentive to his own applause.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 207.
149
    Who but must laugh, if such a man there be?
Who would not weep, if Atticus were he?
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 213.
150
    “On wings of winds came flying all abroad.” 36
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 218.
151
    Cursed be the verse, how well so e’er it flow,
That tends to make one worthy man my foe.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 283.
152
    Satire or sense, alas! can Sporus feel?
Who breaks a butterfly upon a wheel?
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 307.
153
    Eternal smiles his emptiness betray,
As shallow streams run dimpling all the way.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 315.
154
    Wit that can creep, and pride that licks the dust.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 333.
155
    That not in fancy’s maze he wander’d long,
But stoop’d to truth, and moraliz’d his song. 37
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 340.
156
    Me let the tender office long engage
To rock the cradle of reposing age;
With lenient arts extend a mother’s breath,
Make languor smile, and smooth the bed of death;
Explore the thought, explain the asking eye,
And keep awhile one parent from the sky.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 408.
157
    Lord Fanny spins a thousand such a day.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 6.
158
    Satire ’s my weapon, but I ’m too discreet
To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 69.
159
    But touch me, and no minister so sore;
Whoe’er offends at some unlucky time
Slides into verse, and hitches in a rhyme,
Sacred to ridicule his whole life long,
And the sad burden of some merry song.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 76.
160
    Bare the mean heart that lurks behind a star.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 110.
161
    There St. John mingles with my friendly bowl,
The feast of reason and the flow of soul.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 127.
162
    For I, who hold sage Homer’s rule the best,
Welcome the coming, speed the going guest. 38
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire ii. Book ii. Line 159.
163
    Give me again my hollow tree,
A crust of bread, and liberty.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire vi. Book ii. Line 220.
164
    Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epilogue to the Satires. Dialogue i. Line 136.
165
    To Berkeley every virtue under heaven.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epilogue to the Satires. Dialogue ii. Line 73.
166
    When the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 38.
167
    He ’s armed without that ’s innocent within.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 94.
168
    Get place and wealth, if possible, with grace;
If not, by any means get wealth and place. 39
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 103.
169
    Above all Greek, above all Roman fame. 40
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 26.
170
    Authors, like coins, grow dear as they grow old.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 35.
171
    The mob of gentlemen who wrote with ease.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 108.
172
    One simile that solitary shines
In the dry desert of a thousand lines.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 111.
173
    Then marble soften’d into life grew warm,
And yielding, soft metal flow’d to human form. 41
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 147.
174
    Who says in verse what others say in prose.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 202.
175
    Waller was smooth; but Dryden taught to join
The varying verse, the full resounding line,
The long majestic march, and energy divine.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 267.
176
    E’en copious Dryden wanted or forgot
The last and greatest art,—the art to blot.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 280.
177
    Who pants for glory finds but short repose:
A breath revives him, or a breath o’erthrows. 42
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 300.
178
    There still remains to mortify a wit
The many-headed monster of the pit. 43
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 304.
179
    Praise undeserv’d is scandal in disguise. 44
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 413.
180
    Years following years steal something every day;
At last they steal us from ourselves away.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 72.
181
    The vulgar boil, the learned roast, an egg.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 85.
182
    Words that wise Bacon or brave Raleigh spoke.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 168.
183
    Grac’d as thou art with all the power of words,
So known, so honour’d at the House of Lords. 45
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle vi. Book i. To. Mr. Murray.
184
    Vain was the chief’s the sage’s pride!
They had no poet, and they died.
          Odes. Book iv. Ode 9.
185
    Nature and Nature’s laws lay hid in night:
God said, “Let Newton be!” and all was light.
          Epitaph intended for Sir Isaac Newton.
186
    Ye Gods! annihilate but space and time,
And make two lovers happy.
          Martinus Scriblerus on the Art of Sinking in Poetry. Chap. xi.
187
    O thou! whatever title please thine ear,
Dean, Drapier, Bickerstaff, or Gulliver!
Whether thou choose Cervantes’ serious air,
Or laugh and shake in Rabelais’ easy-chair.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 19.
188
    Poetic Justice, with her lifted scale,
Where in nice balance truth with gold she weighs,
And solid pudding against empty praise.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 52.
189
    Now night descending, the proud scene was o’er,
But lived in Settle’s numbers one day more.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 89.
190
    While pensive poets painful vigils keep,
Sleepless themselves to give their readers sleep.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 93.
191
    Next o’er his books his eyes begin to roll,
In pleasing memory of all he stole.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 127.
192
    Or where the pictures for the page atone,
And Quarles is sav’d by beauties not his own.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 139.
193
    How index-learning turns no student pale,
Yet holds the eel of science by the tail.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 279.
194
    And gentle Dulness ever loves a joke.
          The Dunciad. Book ii. Line 34.
195
    Another, yet the same. 46
          The Dunciad. Book iii. Line 90.
196
    Till Peter’s keys some christen’d Jove adorn,
And Pan to Moses lends his pagan horn.
          The Dunciad. Book iii. Line 109.
197
    All crowd, who foremost shall be damn’d to fame. 47
          The Dunciad. Book iii. Line 158.
198
    Silence, ye wolves! while Ralph to Cynthia howls,
And makes night hideous; 48 —answer him, ye owls!
          The Dunciad. Book iii. Line 165.
199
    And proud his mistress’ order to perform,
Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm. 49
          The Dunciad. Book iii. Line 263.
200
    A wit with dunces, and a dunce with wits. 50
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 90.
201
    How sweet an Ovid, Murray was our boast!
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 169.
202
    The right divine of kings to govern wrong.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 188.
203
    Stuff the head
With all such reading as was never read:
For thee explain a thing till all men doubt it,
And write about it, goddess, and about it.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 249.
204
    To happy convents bosom’d deep in vines,
Where slumber abbots purple as their wines.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 301.
205
    Led by my hand, he saunter’d Europe round,
And gather’d every vice on Christian ground.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 311.
206
    Judicious drank, and greatly daring din’d.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 318.
207
    Stretch’d on the rack of a too easy chair,
And heard thy everlasting yawn confess
The pains and penalties of idleness.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 342.
208
    E’en Palinurus nodded at the helm.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 614.
209
    Religion blushing, veils her sacred fires,
And unawares Morality expires.
Nor public flame nor private dares to shine;
Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine!
Lo! thy dread empire Chaos is restor’d,
Light dies before thy uncreating word;
Thy hand, great Anarch, lets the curtain fall,
And universal darkness buries all.
          The Dunciad. Book iv. Line 649.
210
    Heaven first taught letters for some wretch’s aid,
Some banish’d lover, or some captive maid.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 51.
211
    Speed the soft intercourse from soul to soul,
And waft a sigh from Indus to the Pole.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 57.
212
    And truths divine came mended from that tongue.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 66.
213
    Curse on all laws but those which love has made!
Love, free as air at sight of human ties,
Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 74.
214
    And love the offender, yet detest the offence. 51
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 192.
215
    How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot!
The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 207.
216
    One thought of thee puts all the pomp to flight;
Priests, tapers, temples, swim before my sight. 52
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 273.
217
    See my lips tremble and my eyeballs roll,
Suck my last breath, and catch my flying soul.
          Eloisa to Abelard. Line 323.
218
    He best can paint them who shall feel them most. 53
          Eloisa to Abelard. Last line.
219
    Not chaos-like together crush’d and bruis’d,
But as the world, harmoniously confus’d,
Where order in variety we see,
And where, though all things differ, all agree.
          Windsor Forest. Line 13.
220
    A mighty hunter, and his prey was man.
          Windsor Forest. Line 61.
221
    From old Belerium to the northern main.
          Windsor Forest. Line 316.
222
    Nor Fame I slight, nor for her favours call;
She comes unlooked for if she comes at all.
          The Temple of Fame. Line 513.
223
    Unblemish’d let me live, or die unknown;
O grant an honest fame, or grant me none!
          The Temple of Fame. Last line.
224
    I am his Highness’ dog at Kew;
Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?
          On the Collar of a Dog.
225
    There, take (says Justice), take ye each a shell:
We thrive at Westminster on fools like you;
’T was a fat oyster,—live in peace,—adieu. 54
          Verbatim from Boileau.
226
    Father of all! in every age,
  In every clime adored,
By saint, by savage, and by sage,
  Jehovah, Jove, or Lord.
          The Universal Prayer. Stanza 1.
227
    Thou great First Cause, least understood.
          The Universal Prayer. Stanza 2.
228
    And binding Nature fast in fate,
  Left free the human will.
          The Universal Prayer. Stanza 3.
229
    And deal damnation round the land.
          The Universal Prayer. Stanza 7.
230
    Teach me to feel another’s woe,
  To hide the fault I see;
That mercy I to others show,
  That mercy show to me. 55
          The Universal Prayer. Stanza 10.
231
    Happy the man whose wish and care
  A few paternal acres bound.
          Ode on Solitude.
232
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown,
  Thus unlamented let me die;
Steal from the world, and not a stone
  Tell where I lie.
          Ode on Solitude.
233
    Vital spark of heavenly flame!
Quit, O quit this mortal frame!
          The Dying Christian to his Soul.
234
    Hark! they whisper; angels say,
Sister spirit, come away!
          The Dying Christian to his Soul.
235
    Tell me, my soul, can this be death?
          The Dying Christian to his Soul.
236
    Lend, lend your wings! I mount! I fly!
O grave! where is thy victory?
O death! where is thy sting?
          The Dying Christian to his Soul.
237
    What beckoning ghost along the moonlight shade
Invites my steps, and points to yonder glade? 56
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 1.
238
    Is there no bright reversion in the sky
For those who greatly think, or bravely die?
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 9.
239
    The glorious fault of angels and of gods.
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 14.
240
    So perish all, whose breast ne’er learn’d to glow
For others’ good, or melt at others’ woe. 57
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 45.
241
    By foreign hands thy dying eyes were clos’d,
By foreign hands thy decent limbs compos’d,
By foreign hands thy humble grave adorn’d,
By strangers honoured, and by strangers mourn’d!
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 51.
242
    And bear about the mockery of woe
To midnight dances and the public show.
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 57.
243
    How lov’d, how honour’d once avails thee not,
To whom related, or by whom begot;
A heap of dust alone remains of thee:
’T is all thou art, and all the proud shall be!
          To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Line 71.
244
    Such were the notes thy once lov’d poet sung,
Till death untimely stopp’d his tuneful tongue.
          Epistle to Robert, Earl of Oxford.
245
    Who ne’er knew joy but friendship might divide,
Or gave his father grief but when he died.
          Epitaph on the Hon. S. Harcourt.
246
    The saint sustain’d it, but the woman died.
          Epitaph on Mrs. Corbet.
247
    Of manners gentle, of affections mild;
In wit a man, simplicity a child. 58
          Epitaph on Gay.
248
    A brave man struggling in the storms of fate,
And greatly falling with a falling state.
While Cato gives his little senate laws,
What bosom beats not in his country’s cause?
          Prologue to Mr. Addison’s Cato.
249
    The mouse that always trusts to one poor hole
Can never be a mouse of any soul. 59
          The Wife of Bath. Her Prologue. Line 298.
250
    Love seldom haunts the breast where learning lies,
And Venus sets ere Mercury can rise.
          The Wife of Bath. Her Prologue. Line 369.
251
    You beat your pate, and fancy wit will come;
Knock as you please, there ’s nobody at home. 60
          Epigram.
252
    For he lives twice who can at once employ
The present well, and e’en the past enjoy. 61
          Imitation of Martial.
253
    Who dared to love their country, and be poor.
          On his Grotto at Twickenham.
254
    Party is the madness of many for the gain of a few. 62
          Thoughts on Various Subjects.
255
    I never knew any man in my life who could not bear another’s misfortunes perfectly like a Christian.
          Thoughts on Various Subjects.
256
    Achilles’ wrath, to Greece the direful spring
Of woes unnumber’d, heavenly goddess, sing!
          The Iliad of Homer. Book i. Line 1.
257
    The distant Trojans never injur’d me.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book i. Line 200.
258
    Words sweet as honey from his lips distill’d.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book i. Line 332.
259
    Shakes his ambrosial curls, and gives the nod,—
The stamp of fate, and sanction of the god.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book i. Line 684.
260
    And unextinguish’d laughter shakes the skies. 63
          The Iliad of Homer. Book i. Line 771.
261
    Thick as autumnal leaves or driving sand.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ii. Line 970.
262
    Chiefs who no more in bloody fights engage,
But wise through time, and narrative with age,
In summer-days like grasshoppers rejoice,—
A bloodless race, that send a feeble voice.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iii. Line 199.
263
    She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iii. Line 208.
264
    Ajax the great…
Himself a host.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iii. Line 293.
265
    Plough the watery deep.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iii. Line 357.
266
    The day shall come, that great avenging day
Which Troy’s proud glories in the dust shall lay,
When Priam’s powers and Priam’s self shall fall,
And one prodigious ruin swallow all.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iv. Line 196.
267
    First in the fight and every graceful deed.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iv. Line 295.
268
    The first in banquets, but the last in fight.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iv. Line 401.
269
    Gods! How the son degenerates from the sire!
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iv. Line 451.
270
    With all its beauteous honours on its head.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book iv. Line 557.
271
    A wealthy priest, but rich without a fault.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book v. Line 16.
272
    Not two strong men the enormous weight could raise,—
Such men as live in these degenerate days. 64
          The Iliad of Homer. Book v. Line 371.
273
    Whose little body lodg’d a mighty mind.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book v. Line 999.
274
    He held his seat,—a friend to human race.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 18.
275
    Like leaves on trees the race of man is found,—
Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; 65
Another race the following spring supplies:
They fall successive, and successive rise.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 181.
276
    Inflaming wine, pernicious to mankind.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 330.
277
    If yet not lost to all the sense of shame.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 350.
278
    ’T is man’s to fight, but Heaven’s to give success.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 427.
279
    The young Astyanax, the hope of Troy.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 467.
280
    Yet while my Hector still survives, I see
My father, mother, brethren, all, in thee.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 544.
281
    Andromache! my soul’s far better part.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vi. Line 624.
282
    He from whose lips divine persuasion flows.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vii. Line 143.
283
    Not hate, but glory, made these chiefs contend;
And each brave foe was in his soul a friend.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vii. Line 364.
284
    I war not with the dead.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book vii. Line 485.
285
    Aurora now, fair daughter of the dawn,
Sprinkled with rosy light the dewy lawn.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book viii. Line 1.
286
    As full-blown poppies, overcharg’d with rain,
Decline the head, and drooping kiss the plain,—
So sinks the youth; his beauteous head, deprest
Beneath his helmet, drops upon his breast.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book viii. Line 371.
287
    Who dares think one thing, and another tell,
My heart detests him as the gates of hell. 66
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ix. Line 412.
288
    Life is not to be bought with heaps of gold:
Not all Apollo’s Pythian treasures hold,
Or Troy once held, in peace and pride of sway,
Can bribe the poor possession of a day.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ix. Line 524.
289
    Short is my date, but deathless my renown.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ix. Line 535.
290
    Injustice, swift, erect, and unconfin’d,
Sweeps the wide earth, and tramples o’er mankind.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ix. Line 628.
291
    A generous friendship no cold medium knows,
Burns with one love, with one resentment glows.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book ix. Line 725.
292
    To labour is the lot of man below;
And when Jove gave us life, he gave us woe.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book x. Line 78.
293
    Content to follow when we lead the way.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book x. Line 141.
294
    He serves me most who serves his country best. 67
          The Iliad of Homer. Book x. Line 201.
295
    Praise from a friend, or censure from a foe,
Are lost on hearers that our merits know.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book x. Line 293.
296
    The rest were vulgar deaths, unknown to fame.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xi. Line 394.
297
    Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
And asks no omen but his country’s cause.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xii. Line 283.
298
    The life which others pay let us bestow,
And give to fame what we to nature owe.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xii. Line 393.
299
    And seem to walk on wings, and tread in air.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xiii. Line 106.
300
    The best of things beyond their measure cloy.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xiii. Line 795.
301
    To hide their ignominious heads in Troy.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xiv. Line 170.
302
    Persuasive speech, and more persuasive sighs,
Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xiv. Line 251.
303
    Heroes as great have died, and yet shall fall.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xv. Line 157.
304
    And for our country ’t is a bliss to die.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xv. Line 583.
305
    Like strength is felt from hope and from despair.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xv. Line 852.
306
    Two friends, two bodies with one soul inspir’d. 68
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xvi. Line 267.
307
    Dispel this cloud, the light of Heaven restore;
Give me to see, and Ajax asks no more.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xvii. Line 730.
308
    The mildest manners, and the gentlest heart.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xvii. Line 756.
309
    In death a hero, as in life a friend!
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xvii. Line 758.
310
    Patroclus, lov’d of all my martial train,
Beyond mankind, beyond myself, is slain!
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xviii. Line 103.
311
    I live an idle burden to the ground.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xviii. Line 134.
312
    Ah, youth! forever dear, forever kind.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xix. Line 303.
313
    Accept these grateful tears! for thee they flow,—
For thee, that ever felt another’s woe!
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xix. Line 319.
314
    Where’er he mov’d, the goddess shone before.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xx. Line 127.
315
    The matchless Ganymed, divinely fair. 69
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xx. Line 278.
316
    ’T is fortune gives us birth,
But Jove alone endues the soul with worth.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xx. Line 290.
317
    Our business in the field of fight
Is not to question, but to prove our might.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xx. Line 304.
318
    A mass enormous! which in modern days
No two of earth’s degenerate sons could raise. 70
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xx. Line 337.
319
    The bitter dregs of fortune’s cup to drain.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 85.
320
    Who dies in youth and vigour, dies the best.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 100.
321
    This, this is misery! the last, the worst
That man can feel.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 106.
322
    No season now for calm familiar talk.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 169.
323
    Jove lifts the golden balances that show
The fates of mortal men, and things below.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 271.
324
    Achilles absent was Achilles still.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 418.
325
    Forever honour’d, and forever mourn’d.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 422.
326
    Unwept, unhonour’d, uninterr’d he lies! 71
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 484.
327
    Grief tears his heart, and drives him to and fro
In all the raging impotence of woe.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 526.
328
    Sinks my sad soul with sorrow to the grave.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxii. Line 543.
329
    ’T is true, ’t is certain; man though dead retains
Part of himself: the immortal mind remains.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiii. Line 122.
330
    Base wealth preferring to eternal praise.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiii. Line 368.
331
    It is not strength, but art, obtains the prize, 72
And to be swift is less than to be wise.
’T is more by art than force of num’rous strokes.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiii. Line 383.
332
    A green old age, 73 unconscious of decays,
That proves the hero born in better days.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiii. Line 929.
333
    Two urns by Jove’s high throne have ever stood,—
The source of evil one, and one of good.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiv. Line 663.
334
    The mildest manners with the bravest mind.
          The Iliad of Homer. Book xxiv. Line 963.
335
    Fly, dotard, fly!
With thy wise dreams and fables of the sky.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ii. Line 207.
336
    And what he greatly thought, he nobly dar’d.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ii. Line 312.
337
    Few sons attain the praise
Of their great sires, and most their sires disgrace.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ii. Line 315.
338
    For never, never, wicked man was wise.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ii. Line 320.
339
    Urge him with truth to frame his fair replies;
And sure he will: for Wisdom never lies.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 25.
340
    The lot of man,—to suffer and to die.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 117.
341
    A faultless body and a blameless mind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 138.
342
    The long historian of my country’s woes.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 142.
343
    Forgetful youth! but know, the Power above
With ease can save each object of his love;
Wide as his will extends his boundless grace.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 285.
344
    When now Aurora, daughter of the dawn,
With rosy lustre purpled o’er the lawn.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iii. Line 516.
345
    These riches are possess’d, but not enjoy’d!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 118.
346
    Mirror of constant faith, rever’d and mourn’d!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 229.
347
    There with commutual zeal we both had strove
In acts of dear benevolence and love:
Brothers in peace, not rivals in command.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 241.
348
    The glory of a firm, capacious mind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 262.
349
    Wise to resolve, and patient to perform.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 372.
350
    The leader, mingling with the vulgar host,
Is in the common mass of matter lost.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 397.
351
    O thou, whose certain eye foresees
The fix’d events of fate’s remote decrees.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 627.
352
    Forget the brother, and resume the man.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 732.
353
    Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 917.
354
    The people’s parent, he protected all.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 921.
355
    The big round tear stands trembling in her eye.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 936.
356
    The windy satisfaction of the tongue.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book iv. Line 1092.
357
    Heaven hears and pities hapless men like me,
For sacred ev’n to gods is misery.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book v. Line 572.
358
    The bank he press’d, and gently kiss’d the ground.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book v. Line 596.
359
    A heaven of charms divine Nausicaa lay.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vi. Line 22.
360
    Jove weighs affairs of earth in dubious scales,
And the good suffers while the bad prevails.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vi. Line 229.
361
    By Jove the stranger and the poor are sent,
And what to those we give, to Jove is lent.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vi. Line 247.
362
    A decent boldness ever meets with friends.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 67.
363
    To heal divisions, to relieve th’ opprest;
In virtue rich; in blessing others, blest.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 95.
364
    Oh, pity human woe!
’T is what the happy to the unhappy owe.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 198.
365
    Whose well-taught mind the present age surpast.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 210.
366
    For fate has wove the thread of life with pain,
And twins ev’n from the birth are misery and man!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 263.
367
    In youth and beauty wisdom is but rare!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book vii. Line 379.
368
    And every eye
Gaz’d, as before some brother of the sky.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 17.
369
    Nor can one word be chang’d but for a worse.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 192.
370
    And unextinguish’d laughter shakes the sky. 74
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 366.
371
    Behold on wrong
Swift vengeance waits; and art subdues the strong!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 367.
372
    A gen’rous heart repairs a sland’rous tongue.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 432.
373
    Just are the ways of Heaven: from Heaven proceed
The woes of man; Heaven doom’d the Greeks to bleed,—
A theme of future song!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book viii. Line 631.
374
    Earth sounds my wisdom and high heaven my fame.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ix. Line 20.
375
    Strong are her sons, though rocky are her shores.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ix. Line 28.
376
    Lotus, the name; divine, nectareous juice!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ix. Line 106.
377
    Respect us human, and relieve us poor.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book ix. Line 318.
378
    Rare gift! but oh what gift to fools avails!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 29.
379
    Our fruitless labours mourn,
And only rich in barren fame return.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 46.
380
    No more was seen the human form divine. 75
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 278.
381
    And not a man appears to tell their fate.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 308.
382
    Let him, oraculous, the end, the way,
The turns of all thy future fate display.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 642.
383
    Born but to banquet, and to drain the bowl.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book x. Line 662.
384
    Thin airy shoals of visionary ghosts.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 48.
385
    Who ne’er knew salt, or heard the billows roar.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 153.
386
    Heav’d on Olympus tott’ring Ossa stood;
On Ossa, Pelion nods with all his wood. 76
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 387.
387
    The first in glory, as the first in place.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 441.
388
    Soft as some song divine thy story flows.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 458.
389
    Oh woman, woman! when to ill thy mind
Is bent, all hell contains no fouler fiend. 77
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 531.
390
    What mighty woes
To thy imperial race from woman rose!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 541.
391
    But sure the eye of time beholds no name
So blest as thine in all the rolls of fame.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 591.
392
    And pines with thirst amidst a sea of waves.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 722.
393
    Up the high hill he heaves a huge round stone.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 736.
394
    There in the bright assemblies of the skies.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 745.
395
    Gloomy as night he stands.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xi. Line 749.
396
    All, soon or late, are doom’d that path to tread.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xii. Line 31.
397
    And what so tedious as a twice-told tale. 78
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xii. Line 538.
398
    He ceas’d; but left so pleasing on their ear
His voice, that list’ning still they seem’d to hear.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiii. Line 1.
399
    His native home deep imag’d in his soul.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiii. Line 38.
400
    And bear unmov’d the wrongs of base mankind,
The last and hardest conquest of the mind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiii. Line 353.
401
    How prone to doubt, how cautious are the wise!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiii. Line 375.
402
    It never was our guise
To slight the poor, or aught humane despise.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiv. Line 65.
403
    The sex is ever to a soldier kind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiv. Line 246.
404
    Far from gay cities and the ways of men.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiv. Line 410.
405
    And wine can of their wits the wise beguile,
Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xiv. Line 520.
406
    Who love too much, hate in the like extreme,
And both the golden mean alike condemn.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 79.
407
    True friendship’s laws are by this rule exprest,—
Welcome the coming, speed the parting guest. 79
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 83.
408
    For too much rest itself becomes a pain.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 429.
409
    Discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 433.
410
    And taste
The melancholy joy of evils past:
For he who much has suffer’d, much will know.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 434.
411
    For love deceives the best of womankind.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xv. Line 463.
412
    And would’st thou evil for his good repay?
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xvi. Line 448.
413
    Whatever day
Makes man a slave, takes half his worth away.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xvii. Line 392.
414
    In ev’ry sorrowing soul I pour’d delight,
And poverty stood smiling in my sight.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xvii. Line 505.
415
    Unbless’d thy hand, if in this low disguise
Wander, perhaps, some inmate of the skies. 80
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xvii. Line 576.
416
    Know from the bounteous heaven all riches flow;
And what man gives, the gods by man bestow,
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xviii. Line 26.
417
    Yet taught by time, my heart has learn’d to glow
For others’ good, and melt at others’ woe.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xviii. Line 269.
418
    A winy vapour melting in a tear.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xix. Line 143.
419
    But he whose inborn worth his acts commend,
Of gentle soul, to human race a friend.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xix. Line 383.
420
    The fool of fate,—thy manufacture, man.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xx. Line 254.
421
    Impatient straight to flesh his virgin sword.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xx. Line 461.
422
    Dogs, ye have had your day!
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxii. Line 41.
423
    For dear to gods and men is sacred song.
Self-taught I sing; by Heaven, and Heaven alone,
The genuine seeds of poesy are sown.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxii. Line 382.
424
    So ends the bloody business of the day.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxii. Line 516.
425
    And rest at last where souls unbodied dwell,
In ever-flowing meads of Asphodel.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxiv. Line 19.
426
    The ruins of himself! now worn away
With age, yet still majestic in decay.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxiv. Line 271.
427
    And o’er the past Oblivion stretch her wing.
          The Odyssey of Homer. Book xxiv. Line 557.
428
    Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. 81
          Letter to Gay, Oct. 6, 1727.
429
    This is the Jew
That Shakespeare drew. 82
 
Note 1.
See Milton, Quotation 4.

There is no theme more plentiful to scan
Than is the glorious goodly frame of man.
Du Bartas: Days and Weeks, third day. [back]
Note 2.
See Milton, Quotation 218. [back]
Note 3.
Thus we never live, but we hope to live; and always disposing ourselves to be happy.—Blaise Pascal: Thoughts, chap. v. 2. [back]
Note 4.
All the parts of the universe I have an interest in: the earth serves me to walk upon; the sun to light me; the stars have their influence upon me.—Montaigne: Apology for Raimond Sebond. [back]
Note 5.
See Sir John Davies, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 6.
See Dryden, Quotation 5. [back]
Note 7.
There is no great and no small.—Ralph Waldo Emerson: Epigraph to History. [back]
Note 8.
See Dryden, Quotation 91. [back]
Note 9.
La vray science et le vray étude de l’homme c’est l’homme (The true science and the true study of man is man).—Charron: De la Sagesse, lib. i. chap. 1.

Trees and fields tell me nothing: men are my teachers.—Plato: Phædrus. [back]
Note 10.
What a chimera, then, is man! what a novelty, what a monster, what a chaos, what a subject of contradiction, what a prodigy! A judge of all things, feeble worm of the earth, depositary of the truth, cloaca of uncertainty and error, the glory and the shame of the universe.—Blaise Pascal: Thoughts, chap. x. [back]
Note 11.
See Dryden, Quotation 23. [back]
Note 12.
Why may not a goose say thus?… there is nothing that yon heavenly roof looks upon so favourably as me; I am the darling of Nature. Is it not man that keeps and serves me?—Montaigne: Apology for Raimond Lebond. [back]
Note 13.
See Cowley, Quotation 4. [back]
Note 14.
See Fletcher, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 15.
See Cowley, Quotation 18. [back]
Note 16.
May see thee now, though late, redeem thy name,
And glorify what else is damn’d to fame.
Richard Savage: Character of Foster. [back]
Note 17.
See Bolingbroke, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 18.
See Dryden, Quotation 64. [back]
Note 19.
’T is virtue makes the bliss where’er we dwell.—William Collins: Oriental Eclogues, i. line 5. [back]
Note 20.
Omnia mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis (All things change, and we change with them).—Matthias Borbonius: Deliciæ Poetarum Germanorum, i. 685. [back]
Note 21.
See Prior, Quotation 10. [back]
Note 22.
See Milton, Quotation 90. [back]
Note 23.
See Brown, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 24.
See Suckling, Quotation 7. [back]
Note 25.
Quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus (Even the worthy Homer some times nods).—Horace: De Arte Poetica, 359. [back]
Note 26.
See Bacon, Quotation 18. [back]
Note 27.
See Suckling, Quotation 10. [back]
Note 28.
Then gently scan your brother man,
Still gentler sister woman;
Though they may gang a kennin’ wrang,
To step aside is human.
Robert Burns: Address to the Unco Guid. [back]
Note 29.
See Shakespeare, King Richard III, Quotation 5. [back]
Note 30.
Indocti discant et ament meminisse periti (Let the unlearned learn, and the learned delight in remembering). This Latin hexameter, which is commonly ascribed to Horace, appeared for the first time as an epigraph to President Hénault’s “Abrégé Chronologique,” and in the preface to the third edition of this work Hénault acknowledges that he had given it as a translation of this couplet. [back]
Note 31.
See Burton, Quotation 66. [back]
Note 32.
See Bacon, Quotation 40. [back]
Note 33.
See Denham, Quotation 4. [back]
Note 34.
When needs he must, yet faintly then he praises;
Somewhat the deed, much more the means he raises:
So marreth what he makes, and praising most, dispraises.
P. Fletcher: The Purple Island, canto vii. [back]
Note 35.
See Quotation 248. [back]
Note 36.
See Sternhold, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 37.
See Spenser, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 38.
This line is repeated in the translation of the Odyssey, book xv. line 83, with “parting” instead of “going.” [back]
Note 39.
See Ben Jonson, Quotation 4. [back]
Note 40.
See Dryden, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 41.
The canvas glow’d beyond ev’n Nature warm;
The pregnant quarry teem’d with human form.
Oliver Goldsmith: The Traveller, line 137. [back]
Note 42.
A breath can make them as a breath has made.—Oliver Goldsmith: The Deserted Village, line 54. [back]
Note 43.
See Sidney, Quotation 6. [back]
Note 44.
This line is from a poem entitled “To the Celebrated Beauties of the British Court,” given in Bell’s “Fugitive Poetry,” vol. iii. p. 118.

The following epigram is from “The Grove,” London, 1721:—

When one good line did much my wonder raise,
In Br—st’s work, I stood resolved to praise,
And had, but that the modest author cries,
“Praise undeserved is scandal in disguise.”
On a certain line of Mr. Br——, Author of a Copy of Verses called the British Beauties. [back]
Note 45.
See Cibber, Quotation 21. [back]
Note 46.
Another, yet the same.—Thomas Tickell: From a Lady in England. Samuel Johnson: Life of Dryden. Darwin: Botanic Garden, part i. canto iv. line 380. William Wordsworth: The Excursion, Book ix. Sir Walter Scott: The Abbot, chap. i. Horace: carmen secundum, line 10. [back]
Note 47.
May see thee now, though late, redeem thy name,
And glorify what else is damn’d to fame.
Richard Savage: Character of Foster. [back]
Note 48.
See Shakespeare, Hamlet, Quotation 53. [back]
Note 49.
See Addison, Quotation 21. [back]
Note 50.
See Shakespeare, King Henry V, Quotation 31.

This man [Chesterfield], I thought, had been a lord among wits; but I find he is only a wit among lords.—Samuel Johnson (Boswell’s Life): vol. ii. ch. i.

A fool with judges, amongst fools a judge.—William Cowper: Conversation, line 298.

Although too much of a soldier among sovereigns, no one could claim with better right to be a sovereign among soldiers.—Sir Walter Scott: Life of Napoleon.

He [Steele] was a rake among scholars, and a scholar among rakes.—Thomas B. Macaulay: Review of Aikin’s Life of Addison.

Temple was a man of the world among men of letters, a man of letters among men of the world.—Thomas B. Macaulay: Review of Life and Writings of Sir William Temple.

Greswell in his “Memoirs of Politian” says that Sannazarius himself, inscribing to this lady [Cassandra Marchesia] an edition of his Italian Poems, terms her “delle belle eruditissima, delle erudite bellissima” (most learned of the fair; fairest of the learned).

Qui stultis videri eruditi volunt stulti eruditis videntur (Those who wish to appear wise among fools, among the wise seem foolish).—Quintilian, x. 7. 22. [back]
Note 51.
See Dryden, Quotation 61. [back]
Note 52.
Priests, altars, victims, swam before my sight.—Edmund Smith: Phædra and Hippolytus, act i. sc. 1. [back]
Note 53.
See Addison, Quotation 22. [back]
Note 54.
”Tenez voilà,” dit-elle, “à chacun une écaille,
Des sottises d’autrui nous vivons au Palais;
Messieurs, l’huître étoit bonne. Adieu. Vivez en paix.”
Nicholas Boileau-Despreaux: Epître ii. (à M. l’Abbé des Roches) [back]
Note 55.
See Spenser, Quotation 22. [back]
Note 56.
See Ben Jonson, Quotation 27. [back]
Note 57.
See Quotation 417. [back]
Note 58.
See Dryden, Quotation 36. [back]
Note 59.
See Chaucer, Quotation 30. Herbert, Quotation 30. [back]
Note 60.
His wit invites you by his looks to come,
But when you knock, it never is at home.
William Cowper: Conversation, line 303. [back]
Note 61.
Ampliat ætatis spatium sibi vir bonus; hoc est
Vivere bis vita posse priore frui
(The good man prolongs his life; to be able to enjoy one’s past life is to live twice).—Martial, x. 237.

See Cowley, Quotation 21. [back]
Note 62.
From Roscoe’s edition of Pope, vol. v. p. 376; originally printed in Motte’s “Miscellanies,” 1727. In the edition of 1736 Pope says, “I must own that the prose part (the Thought on Various Subjects), at the end of the second volume, was wholly mine. January, 1734.” [back]
Note 63.
The same line occurs in the translation of the Odyssey, book viii. line 366. [back]
Note 64.
A mass enormous! which in modern days
No two of earth’s degenerate sons could raise.
Book xx. line 337. [back]
Note 65.
As of the green leaves on a thick tree, some fall, and some grow.—Ecclesiasticus xiv. 18. [back]
Note 66.
The same line, with “soul” for “heart,” occurs in the translation of the Odyssey, book xiv. line 181. [back]
Note 67.
He serves his party best who serves the country best.—Rutherford B. Hayes: Inaugural Address, March 5, 1877. [back]
Note 68.
A friend is one soul abiding in two bodies.—Diogenes Laertius: On Aristotle.

Two souls with but a single thought,
Two hearts that beat as one.
Von Münch Bellinghausen: Ingomar the Barbarian, act ii. [back]
Note 69.
Divinely fair.—Alfred Tennyson: A Dream of Fair Women, xxii. [back]
Note 70.
See Quotation 272. [back]
Note 71.
Unwept, unhonoured, and unsung.—Sir Walter Scott: Lay of the Last Minstrel.

Unknelled, uncoffined, and unknown.—Lord Byron: Childe Harold, canto iv. stanza 179. [back]
Note 72.
See Middleton, Quotation 8. [back]
Note 73.
See Dryden, Quotation 92. [back]
Note 74.
See Quotation 260. [back]
Note 75.
Human face divine.—John Milton: Paradise Lost, book iii. line 44. [back]
Note 76.
Then the Omnipotent Father with his thunder made Olympus tremble, and from Ossa hurled Pelion.—Ovid: Metamorphoses i. [back]
Note 77.
See Otway, Quotation 4. [back]
Note 78.
See Shakespeare, King John, Quotation 17. [back]
Note 79.
See Quotation 162. [back]
Note 80.
Be not forgetful to entertain strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.—Hebrews xiii. 2. [back]
Note 81.
Pope calls this the eighth beatitude (Roscoe’s edition of Pope, vol. x. page 184). [back]
Note 82.
On the 14th of February, 1741, Macklin established his fame as an actor in the character of Shylock, in the “Merchant of Venice.”… Macklin’s performance of this character so forcibly struck a gentleman in the pit that he, as it were involuntarily, exclaimed,—

“This is the Jew
That Shakespeare drew!”

It has been said that this gentleman was Mr. Pope, and that he meant his panegyric on Macklin as a satire against Lord Lansdowne.—Biographia Dramatica, vol. i. part ii. p. 469. [back]
 

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