Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 105
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 105
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
1200
    Sometime she driveth o’er a soldier’s neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,
And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two
And sleeps again.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 4.
1201
    True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 4.
1202
    For you and I are past our dancing days. 1
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 5.
1203
    It seems she hangs 2 upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 5.
1204
    Shall have the chinks.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 5.
1205
    Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 5.
1206
    Young Adam Cupid, he that shot so trim,
When King Cophetua loved the beggar maid!
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 1.
1207
    He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 3
1208
    See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 4
1209
    O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 5
1210
    What ’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 6
1211
    For stony limits cannot hold love out.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 7
1212
    Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act ii. Sc. 2. 8
 
Note 1.
My dancing days are done.—Beaumont and Fletcher: The Scornful Lady, act v. sc. 3. [back]
Note 2.
Dyce, Knight, and White read, “Her beauty hangs.” [back]
Note 3.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
Note 4.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
Note 5.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
Note 6.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
Note 7.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
Note 8.
Act ii. sc. 1 in White. [back]
 

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