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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 190
 
 
Robert Burton. (1577–1640) (continued)
 
2149
    Seneca thinks the gods are well pleased when they see great men contending with adversity.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 1, Subsect. 1.
2150
    Machiavel says virtue and riches seldom settle on one man.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 2.
2151
    Almost in every kingdom the most ancient families have been at first princes’ bastards; their worthiest captains, best wits, greatest scholars, bravest spirits in all our annals, have been base [born].
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 2.
2152
    As he said in Machiavel, omnes eodem patre nati, Adam’s sons, conceived all and born in sin, etc. “We are by nature all as one, all alike, if you see us naked; let us wear theirs and they our clothes, and what is the difference?”
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 2.
2153
    Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride a gallop. 1
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 2.
2154
    Christ himself was poor…. And as he was himself, so he informed his apostles and disciples, they were all poor, prophets poor, apostles poor. 2
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 3.
2155
    Who cannot give good counsel? ’T is cheap, it costs them nothing.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 3.
2156
    Many things happen between the cup and the lip. 3
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 3.
2157
    What can’t be cured must be endured.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 3.
2158
    Everything, saith Epictetus, hath two handles,—the one to be held by, the other not.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 3.
2159
    All places are distant from heaven alike.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part ii. Sect. 2, Memb. 4.
 
Note 1.
Set a beggar on horseback, and he ’ll outride the Devil.—Bohn: Foreign Proverbs (German). [back]
Note 2.
See Wotton, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 3.
There is many a slip ’twixt the cup and the lip.—Hazlitt: English Proverbs.

Though men determine, the gods doo dispose; and oft times many things fall out betweene the cup and the lip.—Greene: Perimedes the Blacksmith (1588). [back]
 

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