Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 33
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 33
 
 
John Lyly. (1554?–1606) (continued)
 
289
    Lette me stande to the maine chance. 1
          Euphues, 1579 (Arber’s reprint), page 104.
290
    I mean not to run with the Hare and holde with the Hounde. 2
          Euphues, 1579 (Arber’s reprint), page 107.
291
    It is a world to see. 3
          Euphues, 1579 (Arber’s reprint), page 116.
292
    There can no great smoke arise, but there must be some fire. 4
          Euphues and his Euphœbus, page 153.
293
    A clere conscience is a sure carde. 5
          Euphues, page 207.
294
    As lyke as one pease is to another.
          Euphues, page 215.
295
    Goe to bed with the Lambe, and rise with the Larke. 6
          Euphues and his England, page 229.
296
    A comely olde man as busie as a bee.
          Euphues and his England, page 252.
297
    Maydens, be they never so foolyshe, yet beeing fayre they are commonly fortunate.
          Euphues and his England, page 279.
298
    Where the streame runneth smoothest, the water is deepest. 7
          Euphues and his England, page 287.
299
    Your eyes are so sharpe that you cannot onely looke through a Milstone, but cleane through the minde.
          Euphues and his England, page 289.
300
    I am glad that my Adonis hath a sweete tooth in his head.
          Euphues and his England, page 308.
301
    A Rose is sweeter in the budde than full blowne. 8
          Euphues and his England, page 314.
 
Note 1.
The main chance.—William Shakespeare: 1 Henry VI. act i. sc. 1. Samuel Butler: Hudibras, part ii. canto ii. John Dryden: Persius, satire vi. [back]
Note 2.
See Heywood, Quotation 47. [back]
Note 3.
’T is a world to see.—William Shakespeare: Taming of the Shrew, act ii. sc. 1. [back]
Note 4.
See Heywood, Quotation 102. [back]
Note 5.
This is a sure card.—Thersytes, circa 1550. [back]
Note 6.
To rise with the lark and go to bed with the lamb.—Breton: Court and Country, 1618 (reprint, page 182).

Rise with the lark, and with the lark to bed.—James Hurdis: The Village Curate. [back]
Note 7.
See Raleigh, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 8.
The rose is fairest when ’t is budding new.—Sir Walter Scott: Lady of the Lake, canto iii. st. 1. [back]
 

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