Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 370
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 370
 
 
Samuel Johnson. (1709–1784) (continued)
 
4032
    Sir, he [Bolingbroke] was a scoundrel and a coward: a scoundrel for charging a blunderbuss against religion and morality; a coward, because he had not resolution to fire it off himself, but left half a crown to a beggarly Scotchman to draw the trigger at his death.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 1 Vol. ii. Chap. i. 1754.
4033
    Is not a patron, my lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and when he has reached ground encumbers him with help?
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 2 Vol. ii. Chap. ii. 1755.
4034
    I am glad that he thanks God for anything.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 3 Vol. ii. Chap. ii. 1755.
4035
    If a man does not make new acquaintances as he advances through life, he will soon find himself left alone. A man, sir, should keep his friendship in a constant repair.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 4 Vol. ii. Chap. ii. 1755.
4036
    Being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 5 Vol. ii. Chap. iii. 1759.
4037
    Sir, I think all Christians, whether Papists or Protestants, agree in the essential articles, and that their differences are trivial, and rather political than religious. 6
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 7 Vol. ii. Chap. v. 1763.
4038
    The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees is the high-road that leads him to England.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 8 Vol. ii. Chap. v. 1763.
4039
    If he does really think that there is no distinction between virtue and vice, why, sir, when he leaves our houses let us count our spoons.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 9 Vol. ii. Chap. v. 1763.
4040
    Sir, your levellers wish to level down as far as themselves; but they cannot bear levelling up to themselves.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 10 Vol. ii. Chap. v. 1763.
 
Note 1.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 2.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 3.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 4.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 5.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 6.
I do not find that the age or country makes the least difference; no, nor the language the actor spoke, nor the religion which they professed,—whether Arab in the desert, or Frenchman in the Academy. I see that sensible men and conscientious men all over the world were of one religion of well-doing and daring.—Ralph Waldo Emerson: The Preacher. Lectures and Biographical Sketches, p. 215. [back]
Note 7.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 8.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 9.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 10.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
 

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