Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 371
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 371
 
 
Samuel Johnson. (1709–1784) (continued)
 
4041
    A man ought to read just as inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 1 Vol. ii. Chap. vi. 1763.
4042
    Sherry is dull, naturally dull; but it must have taken him a great deal of pains to become what we now see him. Such an access of stupidity, sir, is not in Nature.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 2 Vol. ii. Chap. ix. 1763.
4043
    Sir, a woman preaching is like a dog’s walking on his hind legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 3 Vol. ii. Chap. ix. 1763.
4044
    I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else. 4
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 5 Vol. ii. Chap. ix. 1763.
4045
    This was a good dinner enough, to be sure, but it was not a dinner to ask a man to.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 6 Vol. ii. Chap. ix. 1763.
4046
    A very unclubable man.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 7 Vol. ii. Chap. ix. 1764.
4047
    I do not know, sir, that the fellow is an infidel; but if he be an infidel, he is an infidel as a dog is an infidel; that is to say, he has never thought upon the subject.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 8 Vol. iii. Chap. iii. 1769.
4048
    It matters not how a man dies, but how he lives.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 9 Vol. iii. Chap. iv. 1769.
4049
    That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one. 10
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 11 Vol. iii. Chap. v. 1770.
4050
    I am a great friend to public amusements; for they keep people from vice.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 12 Vol. iii. Chap. viii. 1772.
4051
    A cow is a very good animal in the field; but we turn her out of a garden.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 13 Vol. iii. Chap. viii. 1772.
4052
    Much may be made of a Scotchman if he be caught young.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 14 Vol. iii. Chap. viii. 1772.
4053
    A man may write at any time if he will set himself doggedly to it.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 15 Vol. iv. Chap. ii. 1773.
 
Note 1.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 2.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 3.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 4.
Every investigation which is guided by principles of nature fixes its ultimate aim entirely on gratifying the stomach.—Athenæus: Book vii. chap. ii. [back]
Note 5.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 6.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 7.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 8.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 9.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 10.
Mr. Kremlin as distinguished for ignorance; for he had only one idea, and that was wrong.—Benjamin Disraeli (Earl Beaconsfield): Sybil, book iv. chap. 5. [back]
Note 11.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 12.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 13.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 14.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 15.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
 

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