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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 80
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
887
    And oftentimes excusing of a fault
Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse. 1
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
888
    We cannot hold mortality’s strong hand.
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
889
    Make haste; the better foot before.
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
890
    I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus,
The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool,
With open mouth swallowing a tailor’s news.
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
891
    Another lean unwashed artificer.
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
892
    How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
Make deeds ill done!
          King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.
893
    Mocking the air with colours idly spread.
          King John. Act v. Sc. 1.
894
    ’T is strange that death should sing.
I am the cygnet to this pale faint swan,
Who chants a doleful hymn to his own death, 2
And from the organ-pipe of frailty sings
His soul and body to their lasting rest.
          King John. Act v. Sc. 7.
895
    Now my soul hath elbow-room.
          King John. Act v. Sc. 7.
896
    This England never did, nor never shall,
Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror.
          King John. Act v. Sc. 7.
897
    Come the three corners of the world in arms,
And we shall shock them. Nought shall make us rue,
If England to itself do rest but true.
          King John. Act v. Sc. 7.
898
    Old John of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaster.
          King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 1.
899
    In rage deaf as the sea, hasty as fire.
          King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 1.
900
    The daintiest last, to make the end most sweet.
          King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.
901
    Truth hath a quiet breast.
          King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.
902
    All places that the eye of heaven visits
Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.
          King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.
 
Note 1.
Qui s’excuse, s’accuse (He who excuses himself accuses himself).—Gabriel Meurier: Trésor des Sentences. 1530–1601. [back]
Note 2.
See The Merchant of Venice, Note 4. [back]
 

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