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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 919
 
 
Plutarch. (A.D. 46?–A.D. c. 120) (continued)
 
8849
    Pyrrhus said, “If I should overcome the Romans in another fight, I were undone.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 1 Pyrrhus.
8850
    Themistocles being asked whether he would rather be Achilles or Homer, said, “Which would you rather be,—a conqueror in the Olympic games, or the crier that proclaims who are conquerors?”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 2 Themistocles.
8851
    He preferred an honest man that wooed his daughter, before a rich man. “I would rather,” said Themistocles, “have a man that wants money than money that wants a man.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 3 Themistocles.
8852
    Alcibiades had a very handsome dog, that cost him seven thousand drachmas; and he cut off his tail, “that,” said he, “the Athenians may have this story to tell of me, and may concern themselves no further with me.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 4 Alcibiades.
8853
    Being summoned by the Athenians out of Sicily to plead for his life, Alcibiades absconded, saying that that criminal was a fool who studied a defence when he might fly for it.
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 5 Alcibiades.
8854
    Lamachus chid a captain for a fault; and when he had said he would do so no more, “Sir,” said he, “in war there is no room for a second miscarriage.” Said one to Iphicrates, “What are ye afraid of?” “Of all speeches,” said he, “none is so dishonourable for a general as ‘I should not have thought of it.’”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 6 Iphicrates.
8855
    To Harmodius, descended from the ancient Harmodius, when he reviled Iphicrates [a shoemaker’s son] for his mean birth, “My nobility,” said he, “begins in me, but yours ends in you.” 7
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 8 Iphicrates.
8856
    Once when Phocion had delivered an opinion which pleased the people,… he turned to his friend and said, “Have I not unawares spoken some mischievous thing or other?”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 9 Phocion.
 
Note 1.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 2.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 3.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 4.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 5.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 6.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 7.
I am my own ancestor.—Junot, Duc D’Abrantes (when asked as to his ancestry). [back]
Note 8.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 9.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
 

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