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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  The base (basis prostatæ) is directed upward, and is applied to the inferior surface of the bladder, The greater part of this surface is directly continuous with the bladder wall; the urethra penetrates it nearer its anterior than its posterior border.
  The apex (apex prostatæ) is directed downward, and is in contact with the superior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm.


FIG. 1160– Prostate with seminal vesicles and seminal ducts, viewed from in front and above. (Spalteholz.) (See enlarged image)


Surfaces.—The posterior surface (facies posterior) is flattened from side to side and slightly convex from above downward; it is separated from the rectum by its sheath and some loose connective tissue, and is distant about 4 cm. from the anus. Near its upper border there is a depression through which the two ejaculatory ducts enter the prostate. This depression serves to divide the posterior surface into a lower larger and an upper smaller part. The upper smaller part constitutes the middle lobe of the prostate and intervenes between the ejaculatory ducts and the urethra; it varies greatly in size, and in some cases is destitute of glandular tissue. The lower larger portion sometimes presents a shallow median furrow, which imperfectly separates it into a right and a left lateral lobe: these form the main mass of the gland and are directly continuous with each other behind the urethra. In front of the urethra they are connected by a band which is named the isthmus: this consists of the same tissues as the capsule and is devoid of glandular substance.
  The anterior surface (facies anterior) measures about 2.5 cm. from above downward but is narrow and convex from side to side. It is placed about 2 cm. behind the pubic symphysis, from which it is separated by a plexus of veins and a quantity of loose fat. It is connected to the pubic bone on either side by the puboprostatic ligaments. The urethra emerges from this surface a little above and in front of the apex of the gland.
  The lateral surfaces are prominent, and are covered by the anterior portions of the Levatores ani, which are, however, separated from the gland by a plexus of veins.
  The prostate measures about 4 cm. transversely at the base, 2 cm. in its antero-posterior diameter, and 3 cm. in its vertical diameter. Its weight is about 8 gm. It is held in its position by the puboprostatic ligaments; by the superior fascia of

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