Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 335
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 

The Iliofemoral Ligament (ligamentum iliofemorale; Y-ligament; ligament of Bigelow) (Fig. 339).—The iliofemoral ligament is a band of great strength which lies in front of the joint; it is intimately connected with the capsule, and serves to strengthen it in this situation. It is attached, above, to the lower part of the anterior inferior iliac spine; below, it divides into two bands, one of which passes downward and is fixed to the lower part of the intertrochanteric line; the other is directed downward and lateralward and is attached to the upper part of the same line. Between the two bands is a thinner part of the capsule. In some cases there is no division, and the ligament spreads out into a flat triangular band which is attached to the whole length of the intertrochanteric line. This ligament is frequently called the Y-shaped ligament of Bigelow; and its upper band is sometimes named the iliotrochanteric ligament.


FIG. 340– The hip-joint from behind. (Quain.) (See enlarged image)


The Pubocapsular Ligament (ligamentum pubocapsulare; pubofemoral ligament).—This ligament is attached, above, to the obturator crest and the superior ramus of the pubis; below, it blends with the capsule and with the deep surface of the vertical band of the oliofemoral ligament.

The Ischiocapsular Ligament (ligamentum ischiocapsulare; ischiocapsular band; ligament of Bertin).—The ischiocapsular ligament consists of a triangular band of strong fibers, which spring from the ischium below and behind the acetabulum, and blend with the circular fibers of the capsule (Fig. 340).

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