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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  Below, the fascia is attached to the acromion, the clavicle, and the manubrium sterni. Some little distance above the last it splits into two layers, superficial and deep. The former is attached to the anterior border of the manubrium, the latter to its posterior border and to the interclavicular ligament. Between these two layers is a slit-like interval, the suprasternal space (space of Burns); it contains a small quantity of areolar tissue, the lower portions of the anterior jugular veins and their transverse connecting branch, the sternal heads of the Sternocleidomastoidei, and sometimes a lymph gland.


FIG. 384– Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. Showing the arrangement of the fascia coli. (See enlarged image)

  The fascia which lines the deep surface of the Sternocleidomastoideus gives off the following processes: (1) A process envelops the tendon at the Omohyoideus, and binds it down to the sternum and first costal cartilage. (2) A strong sheath, the carotid sheath, encloses the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. (3) The prevertebral fascia extends medialward behind the carotid vessels, where it assists in forming their sheath, and passes in front of the prevertebral muscles. It forms the posterior limit of a fibrous compartment, which contains the larynx and trachea, the thyroid gland, and the pharynx and esophagus. The

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