Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 477
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
to the pelvic surface of the inferior ramus of the ischium, i. e., within the margin. Both obturator muscles are connected with this membrane.
  The Obturator internus is situated partly within the lesser pelvis, and partly at the back of the hip-joint. It arises from the inner surface of the antero-lateral wall of the pelvis, where it surrounds the greater part of the obturator foramen, being attached to the inferior rami of the pubis and ischium, and at the side to the inner surface of the hip bone below and behind the pelvic brim, reaching from the upper part of the greater sciatic foramen above and behind to the obturator foramen below and in front. It also arises from the pelvic surface of the obturator membrane except in the posterior part, from the tendinous arch which completes the canal for the passage of the obturator vessels and nerve, and to a slight extent from the obturator fascia, which covers the muscle. The fibers converge rapidly toward the lesser sciatic foramen, and end in four or five tendinous bands, which are found on the deep surface of the muscle; these bands are reflected at a right angle over the grooved surface of the ischium between its spine and tuberosity. This bony surface is covered by smooth cartilage, which is separated from the tendon by a bursa, and presents one or more ridges corresponding with the furrows between the tendinous bands. These bands leave the pelvis through the lesser sciatic foramen and unite into a single flattened tendon, which passes horizontally across the capsule of the hip-joint, and, after receiving the attachments of the Gemelli, is inserted into the forepart of the medial surface of the greater trochanter above the trochanteric fossa. A bursa, narrow and elongated in form, is usually found between the tendon and the capsule of the hip-joint; it occasionally communicates with the bursa between the tendon and the ischium.
  The Gemelli are two small muscular fasciculi, accessories to the tendon of the Obturator internus which is received into a groove between them.
  The Gemellus superior, the smaller of the two, arises from the outer surface of the spine of the ischium, blends with the upper part of the tendon of the Obturator internus, and is inserted with it into the medial surface of the greater trochanter. It is sometimes wanting.
  The Gemellus inferior arises from the upper part of the tuberosity of the ischium, immediately below the groove for the Obturator internus tendon. It blends with the lower part of the tendon of the Obturator internus, and is inserted with it it into the medial surface of the greater trochanter. Rarely absent.
  The Quadratus femoris is a flat, quadrilateral muscle, between the Gemellus inferior and the upper margin of the Adductor magnus; it is separated from the latter by the terminal branches of the medial femoral circumflex vessels. It arises from the upper part of the external border of the tuberosity of the ischium, and is inserted into the upper part of the linea quadrata—that is, the line which extends vertically downward from the intertrochanteric crest. A bursa is often found between the front of this muscle and the lesser trochanter. Sometimes absent.
  The Obturator externus (Fig. 436) is a flat, triangular muscle, which covers the outer surface of the anterior wall of the pelvis. It arises from the margin of bone immediately around the medial side of the obturator foramen, viz., from the rami of the pubis, and the inferior ramus of the ischium; it also arises from the medial two-thirds of the outer surface of the obturator membrane, and from the tendinous arch which completes the canal for the passage of the obturator vessels and nerves. The fibers springing from the pubic arch extend on to the inner surface of the bone, where they obtain a narrow origin between the margin of the foramen and the attachment of the obturator membrane. The fibers converge and pass backward, lateralward, and upward, and end in a tendon which runs across the back of the neck of the femur and lower part of the capsule of the hipjoint and is inserted into the trochanteric fossa of the femur. The obturator vessels lie between the muscle and the obturator membrane; the anterior branch of the

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