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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  Behind the artery are the posterior part of the femoral sheath, the pectineal fascia, the medial part of the tendon of the Psoas major, the Pectineus and the Adductor longus. The artery is separated from the capsule of the hip-joint by the tendon of the Psoas major, from the Pectineus by the femoral vein and profunda vessels, and from the Adductor longus by the femoral vein. The nerve to the Pectineus passes medialward behind the artery. On the lateral side of the artery, but separated from it by some fibers of the Psoas major, is the femoral nerve. The femoral vein is on the medial side of the upper part of the artery, but is behind the vessel in the lower part of the femoral triangle.


FIG. 550– The femoral artery. (See enlarged image)

  In the adductor canal (Fig. 550) the femoral artery is more deeply situated, being covered by the integument, the superficial and deep fasciæ, the Sartorius and the fibrous roof of the canal; the saphenous nerve crosses from its lateral to its medial side. Behind the artery are the Adductores

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