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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
occipital ramus, on to the occipital lobe, where it divides into two parts, which form nearly a right angle with the main stem and constitute the transverse occipital sulcus. The part of the parietal lobe above the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus is named the superior parietal lobule; the part below, the inferior parietal lobule.
  The posterior central gyrus (gyrus centralis posterior; ascending parietal convolution; postcentral gyre) extends from the longitudinal fissure above to the posterior ramus of the lateral fissure below. It lies parallel with the anterior central gyrus, with which it is connected below, and also, sometimes, above, the central sulcus.
  The superior parietal lobule (lobulus parietalis superior) is bounded in front by the upper part of the postcentral sulcus, but is usually connected with the posterior central gyrus above the end of the sulcus; behind it is the lateral part of the parietoöccipital fissure, around the end of which it is joined to the occipital lobe by a curved gyrus, the arcus parietoöccipitalis; below, it is separated from the inferior parietal lobule by the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus.
  The inferior parietal lobule (lobulus parietalis inferior; subparietal district or lobule) lies below the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus, and behind the lower part of the postcentral sulcus. It is divided from before backward into two gyri. One, the supramarginal, arches over the upturned end of the lateral fissure; it is continuous in front with the postcentral gyrus, and behind with the superior temporal gyrus. The second, the angular, arches over the posterior end of the superior temporal sulcus, behind which it is continuous with the middle temporal gyrus.
  The medial surface of the parietal lobe (Fig. 727) is bounded behind by the medial part of the parietoöccipital fissure; in front, by the posterior end of the cingulate sulcus; and below, it is separated from the cingulate gyrus by the subparietal sulcus. It is of small size, and consists of a square-shaped convolution, which is termed the precuneus or quadrate lobe.

Occipital Lobe (lobus occipitalis).—The occipital lobe is small and pyramidal in shape; it presents three surfaces: lateral, medial, and tentorial.
  The lateral surface is limited in front by the lateral part of the parietoöccipital fissure, and by a line carried from the end of this fissure to the preoccipital notch; it is traversed by the transverse occipital and the lateral occipital sulci. The transverse occipital sulcus is continuous with the posterior end of the occipital ramus of the intraparietal sulcus, and runs across the upper part of the lobe, a short distance behind the parietoöccipital fissure. The lateral occipital sulcus extends from behind forward, and divides the lateral surface of the occipital lobe into a superior and an inferior gyrus, which are continuous in front with the parietal and temporal lobes. 1
  The medial surface of the occipital lobe is bounded in front by the medial part of the parietoöccipital fissure, and is traversed by the calcarine fissure, which subdivides it into the cuneus and the lingual gyrus. The cuneus is a wedge-shaped area between the calcarine fissure and the medial part of the parietoöccipital fissure. The lingual gyrus lies between the calcarine fissure and the posterior part of the collateral fissure; behind, it reaches the occipital pole; in front, it is continued on to the tentorial surface of the temporal lobe, and joins the hippocampal gyrus.
  The tentorial surface of the occipital lobe is limited in front by an imaginary transverse line through the preoccipital notch, and consists of the posterior part of the fusiform gyrus (occipitotemporal convolution) and the lower part of the lingual gyrus, which are separated from each other by the posterior segment of the collateral fissure.

Temporal Lobe (lobus temporalis).—The temporal lobe presents superior, lateral, and inferior surfaces.
Note 1.  Elliot Smith has named the lateral occipital sulcus the sulcus lunatus; he regards it as the representative, in the human brain, of the “Affenspalte” of the brain of the ape. [back]

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