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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
it communicates with a branch from the ulnar nerve and sometimes sends a twig to the third Lumbricalis.
  Each proper digital nerve, opposite the base of the first phalanx, gives off a dorsal branch which joins the dorsal digital nerve from the superficial branch of the radial nerve, and supplies the integument on the dorsal aspect of the last phalanx. At the end of the digit, the proper digital nerve divides into two branches, one of which supplies the pulp of the finger, the other ramifies around and beneath the nail. The proper digital nerves, as they run along the fingers, are placed superficial to the corresponding arteries.


FIG. 815– Superficial palmar nerves. (Testut.) (See enlarged image)

  The Ulnar Nerve (n. ulnaris) (Fig. 816) is placed along the medial side of the limb, and is distributed to the muscles and skin of the forearm and hand. It arises from the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and derives its fibers from the eighth cervical and first thoracic nerves. It is smaller than the median, and lies at first behind it, but diverges from it in its course down the arm. At its origin it lies medial to the axillary artery, and bears the same relation to the brachial artery as far as the middle of the arm. Here it pierces the medial intermuscular septum,

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