Fiction > Harvard Classics > Stories from the Thousand and One Nights
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   Stories from the Thousand and One Nights.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Nights 1–3
 
The Story of the Third Sheykh and the Mule
 
 
THE MULE that thou seest was my wife: she became enamoured of a black slave; and when I discovered her with him, she took a mug of water, and, having uttered a spell over it, sprinkled me, and transformed me into a dog. In this state, I ran to the shop of a butcher, whose daughter saw me, and being skilled in enchantment, restored me to my original form, and instructed me to enchant my wife in the manner thou beholdest.—And now I hope that thou wilt remit to me also a third of the merchant’s offence. Divinely was he gifted who said,
        Sow good, even on an unworthy soil; for it will not be lost wherever it is sown.
  1
  When the sheykh had thus finished his story, the Jinni shook with delight, and remitted the remaining third of his claim to the merchant’s blood. The merchant then approached the sheykhs, and thanked them, and they congratulated him on his safety; and each went his way.  2
  But this, said Shahrazad, is not more wonderful than the story of the fisherman. The King asked her, And what is the story of the fisherman? And she related it as follows:—  3
 

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