Reference > Quotations > Frank J. Wilstach, comp. > A Dictionary of Similes
Frank J. Wilstach, comp.  A Dictionary of Similes.  1916.
  Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid; but if persons of quality and judgement concur, then it filleth all round about, and will not easily away; for the odors of ointments are more durable than those of flowers.
            —Francis Bacon
  Fame is like a crop of kanada thissels, very eazy tew sow, but hard tew reap.
            —Josh Billings
  Fame is like a whimsical mistress; she files from those who pursue her most, and follows such as show the least regard to her.
            —Samuel Croxall
  Fame, as a river, is narrowest where it is bred, and broadest far off.
            —Sir William Davenant
  Fame, like a new mistress of the town, is gained with ease, but then she’s lost as soon.
            —John Dryden
  To some characters, fame is like an intoxicating cup placed to the lips,—they do well to turn away from it who fear it will turn their heads. But to others fame is “Love disguised”, the love that answers to love in its widest, most exalted sense.
  Fame, like money, should neither be despised nor idolized.
            —L. Carroll Judson
Fame, like a wayward Girl, will still be coy
  To those who woo her with too slavish knees,
But makes surrender to some thoughtless Boy,

And dotes the more upon a heart at ease.
            —John Keats
  Good fame is like fire: when you have kindled it, you may easily preserve it; but if you once extinguish it, you will not easily kindle it again.
  The way to fame, like the way to heaven, is through much tribulation.
            —Laurence Sterne
  Fragrant his fame as flowers that close not.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne

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