Reference > Quotations > Frank J. Wilstach, comp. > A Dictionary of Similes
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Frank J. Wilstach, comp.  A Dictionary of Similes.  1916.
 
Demophilus
 
  To listen to the advice of a treacherous friend is like drinking poison from a golden cup.  1
  It is the case with children as with plants, that their future character is indicated by their early dispositions.  2
  The disposition is moulded in a happy manner by instruction, as the shapeless material assumes a beautiful form in the hands of a skilful artist.  3
  Education is, to its possessor, like a golden crown, in which honour is united with intrinsic worth.  4
  Flattery resembles the picture of a suit of armour in this respect, that it is calculated to yield delight, not to render any actual service.  5
  Fortune resembles an unjust distributor of the Olympic prizes, in so much as she most frequently bestows her favours on the undeserving.  6
  As the harbour is the refuge of the ship from the tempest, so is friendship the refuge of man in adversity.  7
  Frugality, like a short and pleasant journey, is attended with much enjoyment and little toil.  8
  It is equally precarious to moor a ship by an insufficient anchor, and to ground hope on a capricious temper.  9
  The judgment of the wise is, like gold, distinguished for its superior weight.  10
  A good man, like a well trained wrestler, ought to struggle against adversity with the whole energy of his faculties.  11
  The mind, when imbued with the lessons of wisdom, is like a charioteer; for it restrains the desires implanted in us, and brings us back to virtue.  12
  The wealth of misers, like the evening sun sinking below the horizon, contributes nothing to the enjoyment of mankind.  13
  Vain and frivolous persons, like empty vessels, are easily laid hold of and borne along by the ears.  14
  As swallows give us intimation of fair weather, so the lessons of philosophy point out to us the way to attain tranquility of mind.  15
  Prattlers, like swallows, destroy the pleasure of conversation by incessant loquacity.  16
  Raillery, like salt, should be used sparingly.  17
 
 
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