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Æsop. (Sixth century B.C.)  Fables.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
The Frog and the Ox
 
 
“OH Father,” said a little Frog to the big one sitting by the side of a pool, “I have seen such a terrible monster! It was as big as a mountain, with horns on its head, and a long tail, and it had hoofs divided in two.”  1
  “Tush, child, tush,” said the old Frog, “that was only Farmer White’s Ox. It isn’t so big either; he may be a little bit taller than I, but I could easily make myself quite as broad; just you see.” So he blew himself out, and blew himself out, and blew himself out. “Was he as big as that?” asked he.  2
  “Oh, much bigger than that,” said the young Frog.  3
  Again the old one blew himself out, and asked the young one if the Ox was as big as that.  4
  “Bigger, father, bigger,” was the reply.  5
  So the Frog took a deep breath, and blew and blew and blew, and swelled and swelled and swelled. And then he said: “I’m sure the Ox is not as big as—” But at this moment he burst.
        “SELF-CONCEIT MAY LEAD TO SELF-DESTRUCTION.”
  6
 

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