Nonfiction > Jacob A. Riis > The Battle with the Slum > Page 59
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · ILLUSTRATIONS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Jacob A. Riis (1849–1914).  The Battle with the Slum.  1902.

Page 59
 
business, caters necessarily to its crowds, and therefore sides with them,—he told me with bitter reproach how he had been stricken in pocket. A gambler had just been in to see him, who had come on from the far West, in anticipation of a wide-open town, and had got all ready to open a house in the Tenderloin. “He brought $40,000 to put in the business, and he came to take it away to Baltimore. Just now the cashier of—Bank told me that two other gentlemen—gamblers? yes, that’s what you call them—had drawn $130,000 which they would have invested here, and had gone after him. Think of all that money gone to Baltimore! That’s what you’ve done!”
  I went over to police headquarters, thinking of the sad state of that man, and in the hallway I ran across two children, little tots, who were inquiring their way to “the commissioner.” The older was a hunchback girl, who led her younger brother (he could not have been over five or six years old) by the hand. They explained their case to me. They came from Allen Street. Some “bad ladies” had moved into the tenement, and when complaint was made that sent the police there, the children’s father, who was a poor Jewish tailor, was blamed. The tenants took it out of the boy by punching his nose till it bled. Whereupon the children went straight to Mulberry Street to see “the commissioner”

CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · ILLUSTRATIONS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors