Edward William Bok > The Americanization of Edward Bok > Page 48

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Edward William Bok (1863–1930). The Americanization of Edward Bok. 1921.


Page 48


NO one who called at Phillips Brooks’s house was ever told that the master of the house was out when he was in. That was a rule laid down by Doctor Brooks: a maid was not to perjure herself for her master’s comfort or convenience. Therefore, when Edward was told that Doctor Brooks was out, he knew he was out. The boy waited, and as he waited he had a chance to look around the library and into the books. The rector’s faithful housekeeper said he might when he repeated what Wendell Phillips had told him of the interest that was to be found in her master’s books. Edward did not tell her of Mr. Phillips’s advice to “borrow” a couple of books. He reserved that bit of information for the rector of Trinity when he came in, an hour later.

“Oh! did he?” laughingly said Doctor Brooks. “That is nice advice for a man to give a boy. I am surprised at Wendell Phillips. He needs a little talk: a ministerial visit. And have you followed his shameless advice?” smilingly asked the huge man as he towered above the boy. “No? And to think of the opportunity you had, too. Well, I am glad you had such respect for my dumb friends. For they are my friends,

VI. Phillips Brooks’s Books and Emerson’s Mental Mist
 

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