Edward William Bok > The Americanization of Edward Bok > Page 55

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Edward William Bok (1863–1930). The Americanization of Edward Bok. 1921.


Page 55

“Father,” she said simply, and there, at his desk, sat Emerson—the man whose words had already won Edward Bok’s boyish interest, and who was destined to impress himself upon his life more deeply than any other writer.

Slowly, at the daughter’s spoken word, Emerson rose with a wonderful quiet dignity, extended his hand, and as the boy’s hand rested in his, looked him full in the eyes.

No light of welcome came from those sad yet tender eyes. The boy closed upon the hand in his with a loving pressure, and for a single moment the eyelids rose, a different look came into those eyes, and Edward felt a slight, perceptible response of the hand. But that was all!

Quietly he motioned the boy to a chair beside the desk. Edward sat down and was about to say something, when, instead of seating himself, Emerson walked away to the window and stood there softly whistling and looking out as if there were no one in the room. Edward’s eyes had followed Emerson’s every footstep, when the boy was aroused by hearing a suppressed sob, and as he looked around he saw that it came from Miss Emerson. Slowly she walked out of the room. The boy looked at Miss Alcott, and she put her finger to her mouth, indicating silence. He was nonplussed.

Edward looked toward Emerson standing in that window, and wondered what it all meant. Presently Emerson left the window and, crossing the room, came to his desk, bowing to the boy as he passed, and seated himself, not speaking a word and ignoring the presence of the two persons in the room.

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