Edward William Bok > The Americanization of Edward Bok > Page 84

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Edward William Bok (1863–1930). The Americanization of Edward Bok. 1921.


Page 84

a newsboy who was crying with a heavy bundle of papers under his arm.

“Come along with me, then,” said Mr. Beecher, taking the boy’s hand and leading him into the newspaper office a few doors up the street.

“This boy is stuck,” he simply said to the man behind the counter. “Guess The Eagle can stand it better than this boy; don’t you think so?”

To the grown man Mr. Beecher rarely gave charity. He believed in a return for his alms.

“Why don’t you go to work?” he asked of a man who approached him one day in the street.

“Can’t find any,” said the man.

“Looked hard for it?” was the next question.

“I have,” and the man looked Mr. Beecher in the eye.

“Want some?” asked Mr. Beecher.

“I do,” said the man.

“Come with me,” said the preacher. And then to Edward, as they walked along with the man following behind, he added: “That man is honest.”

“Let this man sweep out the church,” he said to the sexton when they had reached Plymouth Church.

“But, Mr. Beecher,” replied the sexton with wounded pride, “it doesn’t need it.”

“Don’t tell him so, though,” said Mr. Beecher with a merry twinkle of the eye; and the sexton understood.

Mr. Beecher was constantly thoughtful of a struggling young man’s welfare, even at the expense of his own material comfort. Anxious to save him from the labor of writing out the newspaper articles, Edward, himself

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