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John Dryden (1631–1700).  The Poems of John Dryden.  1913.
 
Songs, Odes, and Lyrical Pieces
The Lady’s Song
 
I
A QUIRE 1 of bright Beauties in Spring did appear,
To chuse a May-lady to govern the Year;
All the Nymphs were in White, and the Shepherds in Green,
The Garland was giv’n, and Phillis was Queen;
But Phillis refus’d it, and sighing did say,        5
I’ll not wear a Garland while Pan is away.
 
II
While Pan, and fair Syrinx, are fled from our Shore,
The Graces are banish’d, and Love is no more:
The soft God of Pleasure that warm’d our Desires
Has broken his Bow, and extinguish’d his Fires,        10
And vows that himself, and his Mother, will mourn,
Till Pan and fair Syrinx in Triumph return.
 
III
Forbear your Addresses, and Court us no more,
For we will perform what the Deity swore:
But, if you dare think of deserving our Charms,        15
Away with your Sheephooks, and take to your Arms;
Then Lawrels and Myrtles your Brows shall adorn,
When Pan, and his Son, and fair Syrinx, return.
 
Note 1. Text from the Miscellany Poems, 1704. [back]
 
 
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