Nonfiction > Jacob A. Riis > Theodore Roosevelt, the Citizen > Page 21
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Jacob A. Riis (1849–1914).  Theodore Roosevelt, the Citizen.  1904.

Page 21
 
and, thank God, of mine, let him speak now, and judge yourself how performance has squared with promise, practice with preaching:
  “Of course what we have a right to expect of the American boy is that he shall turn out to be a good American man. Now, the chances are strong that he won’t be much of a man unless he is a good deal of a boy. He must not be a coward or a weakling, a bully, a shirk, or a prig. He must work hard and play hard. He must be clean-minded and clean-lived, and able to hold his own under all circumstances and against all comers. It is only on these conditions that he will grow into the kind of a man of whom America can really be proud.
  “In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard.”

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