Nonfiction > Jacob A. Riis > Theodore Roosevelt, the Citizen > Page 226
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Jacob A. Riis (1849–1914).  Theodore Roosevelt, the Citizen.  1904.

Page 226
 
“DEAR JAKE: “Happy New Year to you and yours, and as a New Year’s gift take the pardon of the policeman Hannigan. The papers were forwarded to the prison this morning. “Ever yours, “THEODORE ROOSEVELT.”
course he had not meant to shoot; he was carried away, and now he had been punished enough. I have preserved the Governor’s answer that came by next day’s mail. It was written on the last day of the year 1899:
  And so one man who that day was without hope started fair with the new year.
  I wish I might go on and write indefinitely of those days and what they were to me: Of that dinner-party to some foreign visitors into which I, taking tea peacefully with Mrs. Roosevelt and the children, was suddenly catapulted by the announcement that through an unexpected arrival there would be thirteen at the table, a fact which would be sure to make some one of the guests uncomfortable, and at which the Governor kept poking quiet fun at

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