Reference > Cambridge History > The End of the Middle Ages > Stephen Hawes > A Joyful Meditation to all England of the Coronation of Henry the Eighth
  The Conversion of Swearers The Example of Virtue  

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume II. The End of the Middle Ages.

IX. Stephen Hawes.

§ 3. A Joyful Meditation to all England of the Coronation of Henry the Eighth.


A Joyful Meditation to all England of the Coronation of Henry the Eighth, in the seven-line Chaucerian stanza, has little to distinguish it from any other coronation poem. We may note, however, that Hawes finds an apology for Henry VII’s avarice in the plea that he was amassing wealth to be ready for war—a view which has been taken by modern historians. He urges the people to be loyal and patriotic. He appeals also to Luna, as mistress of the waves, and to the Wind-god to inspire Englishmen to chase their enemies and—with words that anticipate Ye Mariners of England—to sweep the sea in many a stormy “stour.”   10

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  The Conversion of Swearers The Example of Virtue  
 
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