Reference > Cambridge History > The Age of Dryden > Political and Ecclesiastical Satire > D’Urfey
  Litanies Lilliburlero  

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume VIII. The Age of Dryden.

III. Political and Ecclesiastical Satire.

§ 12. D’Urfey.


Tom D’Urfey appears to have been the most popular ballad-composer under the restoration. Tunes of his, like Sawney will ne’er be my love again, Now the fight’s done, Hark, the thund’ring cannons roar and Burton Hall, were at once made part of the ballad-monger’s stock-in-trade, along with other competitors, such as Digby’s Farewell, Russell’s Farewell, How unhappy is Phyllis in love, Lay by your pleading, and a tory political tune, Now ye Tories that glory.   32

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  Litanies Lilliburlero  
 
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