Reference > Cambridge History > Later National Literature, Part III > Non-English Writings I > The Young Yiddish Writers
  S. Blumgarten The Skitze  

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
VOLUME XVIII. Later National Literature, Part III.

XXXI. Non-English Writings I.

§ 44. The Young Yiddish Writers.


That Yiddish poetry has a future is strongly contended by the“young,” as the rebels of Yiddish rhyme like to style themselves. The conservative Yiddish reader frowns at them; to the Ghetto writer they are anathema; but they are fascinating, like all rebels. The time is not yet ripe to give a just estimate of the individual representatives of this promising school: Mani Leib, M. L. Halpern, Joseph Rolnik, for example. Speaking of Mani Leib the“young” critic Noah Steinberg says that he shook off all proletarian and nationalistic traditions. This they all did. Whether they are proselytes or mere renegades remains to be seen. They are still in the ferment.  17    62

Note 17. Yiddish poets generally call their productions“lieder” and not“gedichte.” [ back ]

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  S. Blumgarten The Skitze  
 
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