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William Blake (1757–1827).  The Poetical Works.  1908.
 
Selections from ‘The Four Zoas’
[Vala in Lower Paradise]
 
(Four Zoas, Night IX, ll. 469–82.)

SO saying, she arose and walkèd round her beautiful house;
And then from her white door she look’d to see her bleating lambs,
But her flocks were gone up from beneath the trees into the hills.
 
‘I see the hand that leadeth me doth also lead my flocks.’
She went up to her flocks, and turnèd oft to see her shining house.        5
She stopp’d to drink of the clear spring, and eat the grapes and apples;
She bore the fruits in her lap; she gather’d flowers for her bosom.
She callèd to her flocks, saying: ‘Follow me, O my flocks!’
 
They follow’d her to the silent valley beneath the spreading trees,
And on the river’s margin she ungirded her golden girdle;        10
She stood in the river and view’d herself within the wat’ry glass,
And her bright hair was wet with the waters. She rose up from the river,
And as she rose her eyes were open’d to the world of waters;
She saw Tharmas sitting upon the rocks beside the wavy sea.
 
 
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