Verse > Anthologies > The Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse > 364. A Basque Peasant returning from Church
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Nicholson & Lee, eds.  The Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse. 1917.
  
364. A Basque Peasant returning from Church
By Anna Bunston (Mrs. De Bary)
  
O LITTLE lark, you need not fly
  To seek your Master in the sky,
  He treads our native sod;
Why should you sing aloft, apart?
Sing to the heaven of my heart;        5
  In me, in me, in me is God!
 
O strangers passing in your car,
You pity me who come so far
  On dusty feet, ill shod;
You cannot guess, you cannot know       10
Upon what wings of joy I go
  Who travel home with God.
 
From far-off lands they bring your fare,
Earth’s choicest morsels are your share,
  And prize of gun and rod;       15
At richer boards I take my seat,
Have dainties angels may not eat:
  In me, in me, in me is God!
 
O little lark, sing loud and long
To Him who gave you flight and song,       20
  And me a heart aflame.
He loveth them of low degree,
And He hath magnified me,
  And holy, holy, holy is His Name!

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