Nonfiction > Abraham Lincoln > Political Debates Between Lincoln and Douglas > Page 163
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Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865).  Political Debates Between Lincoln and Douglas  1897.
 
Page 163
 
 
  Q. 2. “I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to-day, as he did in 1854, against the admission of any more Slave States into the Union, even if the people want them?”  6
  A. I do not now, nor ever did, stand pledged against the admission of any more Slave States into the Union.  7
  Q. 3. “I want to know whether he stands pledged against the admission of a new State into the Union with such a Constitution as the people of that State may see fit to make?”  8
  A. I do not stand pledged against the admission of a new State into the Union, with such a Constitution as the people of that State may see fit to make.  9
  Q. 4. “I want to know whether he stands to-day pledged to the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia?”  10
  A. I do not stand to-day pledged to the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia.  11
  Q. 5. “I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to the prohibition of the slave-trade between the different States?”  12
  A. I do not stand pledged to the prohibition of the slavetrade between the different States.  13
  Q. 6. “I desire to know whether he stands pledged to prohibit slavery in all the Territories of the United States, North as well as South of the Missouri Compromise line?”  14
  A. I am impliedly, if not expressly, pledged to a belief in the right and duty of Congress to prohibit slavery in all the United States Territories.  15
  Q. 7. “I desire him to answer whether he is opposed to the acquisition of any new territory unless slavery is first prohibited therein?”  16
  A. I am not generally opposed to honest acquisition of territory; and, in any given case, I would or would not oppose such acquisition, accordingly as I might think such acquisition would or would not aggravate the slavery question among ourselves.  17
  Now, my friends, it will be perceived upon an examination of these questions and answers, that so far I have only answered that I was not pledged to this, that or the other. The Judge has not framed his interrogatories to ask me anything more than this, and I have answered in strict accordance with the interrogatories,
 

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