Nonfiction > James Ford Rhodes > History of the Civil War, 1861–1865
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James Ford Rhodes (1848–1927).  History of the Civil War, 1861–1865.  1917.
 
Subject Index
 
Page 9
 
 
Lincoln, Abraham, importance of election, 1; and territorial slavery, 2; and compromise, 4; Border-State problem, 6, 7, 26; inauguration, policy on Federal property in seceded States, 6; and Fort Sumter, and Seward’s negotiations, 711; and Seward’s proposed foreign policy, 8; and office-seekers, 8; first call for troops, 16; proclaims blockade, declares privateers pirates, 20; and isolation of Washington, 22; belief in Southern Union men, 27; second call for troops, policy, 31; on Southern aggression, early silence on slavery, on central idea of struggle, 35, 49; and clamor for military advance, 37; and Bull Run, 38, 4244; Congress and extra-legal acts, suspension of writ of habeas corpus, 48; and “contrabands,” 49; appointment of Frémont, 50; and Frémont’s emancipation order, 5153; removes him, 5356; and McClellan’s inactivity (1861) and discourtesy, 60, 61, 63; and recognition of Confederate belligerency, 65; and mediation, 69, 201, 272; and Trent affair, 7173, 79, 80, 82; and Cameron, 84; and Cameron’s negro-soldier recommendation, dismisses him, appointment of Stanton, 85; and Grant after Shiloh, 108; and Merrimac, 113; and plans against New Orleans, 118; and Peninsular campaign, 125, 126; and Jackson’s Valley operations, 129; and Seven Days, 139; handling of slavery question, 149; and compensated emancipation, 149152, 174, 198, 420; and Hunter’s emancipation order, 150; and colonization of negroes, 151, 174; Emancipation Proclamation, 152154, 170174, 196198; reply to Greeley’s appeal, 154; leadership (1862), 155; manipulation of new offer of troops (1862), 155157; search for a military leader, 157; and McClellan after Peninsular campaign, 158, 159; and Pope’s campaign, 160; restores McClellan to command, 161163; and Lee’s invasion of Maryland, 168; administration and election (1862), 175; (1863), 299; Schurz’s criticism, 176; relieves Buell, 179; and McClellan after Antietam, removes him, 179, 180, 182; appointment of Burnside, 182; and Fredericksburg, 185, 186; and Burnside’s later plans, 186; and responsibility for failures, 187; Cabinet crisis, 188192; relations with Seward, 193, 196; and with Chase, 193195; character, contemporary estimation, 194196; and Congress, 204; relieves Burnside, appoints Hooker, 207210; reviews Hooker’s army, 210; and Chancellorsville, 221; field command for, proposed, 222; and Hooker after Chancellorsville, 224; relieves him, appoints Meade, 231; and failure to attack Lee in retreat, 246, 247; and reopening of the Mississippi, 248; and Vicksburg, 251, 256, 258; and Meade after Gettysburg campaign, 291; and Chattanooga, 295; further calls for troops, 299, 328; on Halleck, commissions Grant Lieutenant-General, 303; criticism, 305; political disaffection, 318, 334, 335; and Chase’s candidacy, trend toward renomination, 319; and Grant’s candidacy, and Wilderness campaign, 320; renominated, 321; visit to Grant’s army, 323325; and Early’s raid, 326328; proclamation for day of humiliation, 329; and peace negotiations, 333336; and Sheridan’s Valley campaign, 339; reëlected, 339; and arbitrary arrests, 349, 355; power, 355; on women of the North, 357; effect of war on, 363; sees necessity of destroying Southern armies, 365; comparison with Davis, 396, 429; and March to the sea, 398, 409; and Thirteenth Amendment, 412; Hampton Roads Conference, 417419; and submission, 420; second inaugural, 421; consultation with Grant and Sherman (1865), 427; in Richmond, 433; assassination, 437; fame, 438.
 
Livermore, T. l., acknowledgment to, 238 n.; on Pickett’s charge, 240 n.; 241 n.; 242; on Appomattox campaign, 434 n.
 
Livermore, W. R., acknowledgment to, v; on qualifications of commander, 210.
 
Liverpool, Eng., Southern sympathy, 263; and Emancipation Proclamation, 273.
 
Logan, J. A., and succession to Thomas, 411.
 
London, Eng., and Emancipation Proclamation, 273275.
 
London Times, on shortage of cotton, 66; attitude, 67, 70; apology for slavery, 276.
 
Longfellow, H. W., on Sumner and defeat, 346.
 
Longstreet, James, on Peninsular campaign, 133; Seven Days, 135137; on Pope, 158; Second Bull Run, 160; on Lee and invasion of Maryland, 164; not at Chancellorsville, 211; reorganized command, 225; in Gettysburg campaign, 226; at battle of Gettysburg, 235, 237239; with Bragg, 294; wounded at Wilderness, 307.
 
Louisiana, secession, 5.
See also New Orleans.
 
Louisville, Ky., alarm (1862), 176178.
 
Lowell, J. R., on uprising of the North, 17; on British attitude, 67; desponds, 155; on Lincoln (1864), 319; on yearning for peace, 333, 334.
 
Lushington, Stephen, and Trent affair, 75.
 
 

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