Fiction > Harvard Classics > Jean Racine > Phædra
Ainsi que la vertu, le crime a ses degrês (As virtue has its degrees, so has vice).
Phædra. act iv. sc. 2.
Jean
Racine
Harvard Classics, Vol. 26, Part 3
 
Phædra
 
Jean Racine
 
Recreating the spirit of classical antiquity, Racine draws upon Euripides’s tragedy of Hippolytus. Phædra falls in love with her stepson, Hippolytus, with tragic consequences. In Racine’s version, after being accused of rape and rejected by his father, Hippolytus is killed by a sea-monster. Phædra then commits suicide.
 
Search:    
 
CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record  Characters
TRANSLATED BY ROBERT BRUCE BOSWELL

NEW YORK: P.F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY, 1909–14
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2001
 
 
Introductory Note
 
Act I
Scene I
Scene II
Scene III
Scene IV
Scene V
Act II
Scene I
Scene II
Scene III
Scene IV
Scene V
Scene VI
Act III
Scene I
Scene II
Scene III
Scene IV
Scene V
Scene VI
Act IV
Scene I
Scene II
Scene III
Scene IV
Scene V
Scene VI
Act V
Scene I
Scene II
Scene III
Scene IV
Scene V
Scene VI
Scene VII


 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors