Verse > Anthologies > Alfred H. Miles, ed. > The Sacred Poets of the Nineteenth Century
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Alfred H. Miles, ed.  The Sacred Poets of the Nineteenth Century.  1907.
 
II. “He is gone—beyond the skies”
By Arthur Penrhyn Stanley (1815–1881)
 
HE is gone—beyond the skies,
A cloud receives Him from our eyes;
Gone beyond the highest height
Of mortal gaze or angel’s flight;
Through the veils of Time and Space,        5
Pass’d into the Holiest Place;
All the toil, the sorrow done,
All the battle fought and won.
 
He is gone—and we return,
And our hearts within us burn;        10
Olivet no more shall greet
With welcome shout His coming feet;
Never shall we track Him more
On Gennesareth’s glistening shore;
Never in that look or voice        15
Shall Zion’s hill again rejoice.
 
He is gone—and we remain
In this world of sin and pain;
In the void which He has left,
On this earth of Him bereft,        20
We have still His work to do,
We can still His path pursue;
Seek Him both in friend and foe,
In ourselves His image show.
 
He is gone—we heard Him say,        25
“Good that I should go away.”
Gone is that dear Form and Face,
But not gone His present grace;
Though Himself no more we see,
Comfortless we cannot be:        30
No, His Spirit still is ours,
Quickening, freshening all our powers.
 
He is gone—towards their goal,
World and Church must onwards roll:
Far behind we leave the past;        35
Forwards are our glances cast:
Still His words before us range
Through the ages as they change:
Wheresoe’er the Truth shall lead,
He will give whate’er we need.        40
 
He is gone—but we once more
Shall behold Him as before;
In the Heaven of Heavens the same,
As on earth He went and came.
In the many mansions there,        45
Place for us will He prepare:
In that world, unseen, unknown,
He and we may yet be one.
 
He is gone,—but not in vain;
Wait, until He comes again;        50
He is risen, He is not here,
Far above this earthly sphere,
Evermore in heart and mind,
Where our peace in Him we find:
To our own Eternal Friend,        55
Thitherward let us ascend.
 
 
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