Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 1912–22
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Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  Poetry: A Magazine of Verse.  1912–22.
 
All of Roses
By D. H. Lawrence
 
I
BY the Isar, in the twilight
We were wandering and singing;
By the Isar, in the evening
We climbed the huntsman’s ladder and sat swinging
In the fir-tree overlooking the marshes;        5
While river met with river, and the ringing
Of their pale-green glacier-water filled the evening.
By the Isar, in the twilight
We found our warm wild roses
Hanging red at the river; and simmering        10
Frogs were singing, and over the river closes
Was scent of roses, and glimmering
In the twilight, our kisses across the roses
Met, and her face, and my face, were roses.
 
II
When she rises in the morning
        15
I linger to watch her.
She stands in silhouette against the window,
And the sunbeams catch her
Glistening white on the shoulders;
    While down her sides, the mellow        20
    Golden shadow glows, and her breasts
    Swing like full-blown yellow
    Gloire de Dijon roses.
 
She drips herself with water,
And her shoulders        25
Glisten as silver, they crumple up
Like wet and shaken roses, and I listen
For the rustling of their white, unfolding petals.
    In the window full of sunlight
    She stirs her golden shadow,        30
    And flashes all herself as sun-bright
    As if roses fought with roses.
 
III
Just a few of the roses we gathered from the Isar
Are fallen, and their mauve-red petals on the cloth
Float like boats on a river, waiting        35
For a fairy-wind to wake them from their sloth.
 
She laughs at me across the table, saying
She loves me; and I blow a little boat
Rocking down the shoals between the tea-cups
And so kiss-beladen that it scarce can float.        40
 
IV
Now like a rose come tip-toe out of bud
I see the woman’s soul steal in her eyes,
And wide in ecstasy I sit and watch
The unknown flower issued magic-wise.
 
And day by day out of the envious bud        45
My treasure softly slips uncurled,
And day by day my happiness vibrates
In wide and wider circles round the world.
 
 
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