Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 1912–22
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Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  Poetry: A Magazine of Verse.  1912–22.
 
Envyings
By Katherine Wisner McCluskey
 
I
WHEN I am warmly bathed,
And rubbed a rosy-red,
Cold-creamed to sleek and sweet,
Brushed, braided, gone to bed;
With soft sheets, cool,        5
And soft warm wool,
Gentle and kind like fur,
I wish that I could purr!
It seems a gracious thing to do—
Expressive, exquisite “Thank you”—        10
Thrilling the body through and through!
 
II
As one grows old,
And understands much folly,
Especially the joke of being wise;
And all things are revealed        15
In humorous melancholy,
To seeing and discerning eyes:
There is desire to flap the wings
        And toot
A cynical and mocking, bleak        20
        “Hoot! Hoot!”
 
III
I wish that I could murmur in my throat
With a rich, gurgling, deep-contented note,
        Like the pigeon-coo!
That yodling, colorful tune,        25
Of burnished tone, warmer than words can say,
        Might tell the way
        I feel when loved by you!
 
 
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