Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 1912–22
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Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  Poetry: A Magazine of Verse.  1912–22.
 
Wild Orchard
By William Carlos Williams
 
IT is a broken country,
the rugged land is
green from end to end;
the autumn has not come.
 
Embanked above the orchard        5
the hillside is a wall
of motionless green trees,
the grass is green and red.
 
Five days the bare sky
has stood there day and night.        10
No bird, no sound.
Between the trees
 
stillness
and the early morning light.
The apple trees        15
are laden down with fruit.
 
Among blue leaves
the apples green and red
upon one tree stand out
most enshrined.        20
 
Still, ripe, heavy,
spherical and close,
they mark the hillside.
It is a formal grandeur,
 
a stateliness,        25
a signal of finality
and perfect ease.
Among the savage
 
aristocracy of rocks
one, risen as a tree,        30
has turned
from his repose.
 
 
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