Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Elizabethan Verse
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · GLOSSARY · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Elizabethan Verse.  1907.
 
N’oserez Vous, Mon Bel Ami?
By Robert Greene (1558–1592)
 
SWEET 1 Adon, darest not glance thine eye—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Upon thy Venus that must die?
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,        5
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
See how sad thy Venus lies,—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Love in heart, and tears in eyes;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;        10
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
Thy face as fair as Paphos’ brooks,—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Wherein fancy baits her hooks;        15
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
Thy cheeks like cherries that do grow—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?        20
Amongst the western mounts of snow;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
Thy lips vermilion, full of love,—        25
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Thy neck as silver white as dove;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?        30
 
Thine eyes, like flames of holy fires,—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Burn all my thoughts with sweet desires;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,        35
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
All thy beauties sting my heart;—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
I must die through Cupid’s dart;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;        40
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
Wilt thou let thy Venus die?—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
Adon were unkind, say I,—        45
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
To let fair Venus die for woe—
  N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?        50
That doth love sweet Adon so;
  Je vous en prie, pity me;
N’oserez vous, mon bel, mon bel,
N’oserez vous, mon bel ami?
 
Note 1. From Never Too Late, 1590. Greene several times revived the old combination of French and English verse. It will be noticed that in this poem the first and third line carry on the lyric; the second, fourth, fifth, and sixth being refrains. [back]
 
 
CONTENTS · GLOSSARY · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors