Verse > Anthologies > T. R. Smith, ed. > Poetica Erotica: A Collection of Rare and Curious Amatory Verse
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T. R. Smith, comp.  Poetica Erotica: Rare and Curious Amatory Verse.  1921–22.
 
“Young Corydon and Phillis”
By Sir Charles Sedley (1639–1701)
 
(1707)

          YOUNG Corydon and Phillis
            Sat in a lovely Grove;
          Contriving Crowns of Lilies,
            Repeating Tales of Love:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        5
 
          But as they were a Playing,
            She ogled so the Swain;
          It saved her plainly saying,
            Let’s kiss to ease our Pain:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        10
 
          A thousand times he kissed her,
            Laying her on the Green;
          But as he farther pressed her,
            Her pretty Leg was seen:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        15
 
          So many Beauties viewing,
            His Ardour still increased;
          And greater Joys pursuing,
            He wandered o’er her Breast:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        20
 
          A last Effort she trying,
            His passion to withstand;
          Cried, but ’twas faintly crying,
            Pray take away your Hand:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        25
 
          Young Corydon grown bolder,
            The Minutes would improve;
          This is the Time he told her,
            To shew you how I love;
And something else, but what I dare not name.        30
 
          The Nymph seemed almost dying,
            Dissolved in amorous Heat;
          She kissed, and told him sighing,
            My Dear, your Love is great:
And something else, but what I dare not name.        35
 
          But Phillis did recover
            Much sooner than the Swain;
          She blushing asked her Lover,
            Shall we not Kiss again?
And something else, but what I dare not name.        40
 
          Thus Love his Revels keeping,
            ’Till Nature at a stand;
          From talk they fell to Sleeping,
            Holding each other’s Hand;
And something else, but what I dare not name.        45
 
 
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