Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. I. Chaucer to Donne
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Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
Vol. I. Early Poetry: Chaucer to Donne
 
A Complaint by Night of the Lover Not Beloved
By Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517–1547)
 
ALAS! so all things now do hold their peace!
Heaven and earth disturbed in no thing;
The beasts, the air, the birds their song do cease;
The nightës car the stars about doth bring.
Calm is the sea; the waves work less and less:        5
So am not I, whom love, alas! doth wring,
Bringing before my face the great increase
Of my desires, whereat I weep and sing,
In joy and woe, as in a doubtful ease.
For my sweet thoughts sometime do pleasure bring;        10
But by and by, the cause of my disease
Gives me a pang, that inwardly doth sting.
  When that I think what grief it is again,
  To live and lack the thing should rid my pain.
 
 
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