Verse > Anthologies > William McCarty, ed. > The American National Song Book
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William McCarty, comp.  The American National Song Book.  1842.
 
The Patriot Club
 
A Song for the Fourth of July, 1815

THUS seated round the board, elate
  With patriot pride, in mirth we’ll join;
Here’s to the day we celebrate!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
The glasses gleam on every side,        5
  The table groans with glowing wine;
Here’s Washington, his country’s pride!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
When Freedom bade the battle swell,
  And all her sons of war combine;        10
Here’s to each valiant chief that fell!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
To dauntless Lawrence, just acclaim
  To give, may every patriot join;
And distant ages own his fame!—        15
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Should tyrants swear we shall be ruled,
  Defeated be each base design;
May every gasconade be Hull’d;—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.        20
 
Upon a Frolic for his king,
  When Whynyates ploughs the foamy brine;
Then may a Wasp inflict his sting!
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
With Burrows’ mates in death and fame,        25
  May wreaths of fadeless honour twine
Round Covington’s and Pike’s great name!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Decatur!—son of valiant Mars,
  When foes the generous conflict join,        30
Secure he’ll guard the stripes and stars!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Our Constitution’s iron side,
  Should foes to batter her incline,
Again she’ll crush o’erweening pride—        35
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Like Albion, at Sandusky’s fort,
  Where dauntless Croghan raked the pine; 1
Be still our country’s foes cut Short!— 2
  This is my toast, now give me thine.        40
 
Whate’er the foe that dare to mock
  Fair Freedom’s union, so divine;
A Peacock for each Sparrowhawk!— 3
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Why then, here’s Brown, and Scott, and Gaines,        45
  And Ripley to the trio join;
The hero of Canadian plains—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
When Britain bids her gallant fleet
  On Erie’s glassy bosom shine,        50
A dauntless Perry may she meet;
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Then to the chief that war inflames,
  That broke imperious Proctor’s line;
The victor of the western Thames!        55
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Whene’er an Avon and Reindeer
  To scour the highway deep incline,
May Blakeley check their mad career;—
  This is my toast, now give me thine;        60
 
The Saranac and brave Macomb,
  Macdonough, and his fast-moor’d line:
May foemen meet from them their doom!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
Should any bold Sir Edward roam,        65
  To trespass on bright Freedom’s shrine;
May Jackson send him packing home!—
  This is my toast, now give me thine.
 
May Commerce spread o’er every sea;
  Unshackled may the eagle shine;        70
Be still Columbia great and free!—
  This is my toast, and mine, and mine.

  NOTE.—Each verse of the above is supposed to be sung by a different member of the club, and half the last line, by the whole. The eighteen stanzas contain eighteen toasts, one for each state.
 
Note 1. The ditch, [back]
Note 2. Colonel Short, who led the enemy, was slain. [back]
Note 3. The Epervier. [back]
 
 
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