Verse > Anthologies > William McCarty, ed. > The American National Song Book
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William McCarty, comp.  The American National Song Book.  1842.
 
Parliament of England
 
YOU Parliament of England, you Lords and Commons too,
Consider well what you’re about, and what you mean to do;
You’re now at war with Yankees: I’m sure you’ll rue the day
You roused the sons of Liberty in North America.
 
You first confined our commerce: you said our ships shan’t trade,        5
You then impress’d our seamen, and used them as slaves;
You then insulted Rodgers, while cruising on the main,
And had we not declared war, you’d done it o’er again.
 
You thought our frigates were but few, and Yankees could not fight,
Until bold Hull the Guerriere took, and banish’d her from sight.        10
The Wasp next took your Frolic—you nothing said to that:
The Poictiers being off the coast, of course you took her back.
 
Next your Macedonian, no finer ship could swim,
Decatur took her gilt-work off, and then he took her in.
The Java by a Yankee ship was sunk, you all must know;        15
The Peacock, in all her pride, by Lawrence down did go.
 
Then you sent your Boxer, to beat us all about,
We had an Enterprising brig, that beat the Boxer out;
Then boxed her up to Portland, and moor’d her off the town,
To show the sons of Liberty this Boxer of renown.        20
 
Then up upon Lake Erie brave Perry had some fun:
You own he beat your naval force, and caused them to run;
While Chauncey, on Ontario, the like ne’er known before,
Your British squadron beat complete—some took, some run ashore.
 
Then your brave Indian allies, you call’d them by that name,        25
Until they turn’d the tomahawk, they savages became;
Your mean insinuations they despised from their souls,
And join’d the sons of Liberty, that scorn to be controll’d.
 
Now remember, you Britons, far distant is the day
That e’er you’ll gain by British force your lost America;        30
Go tell your king and parliament, by all the world it’s known,
That British force, by sea and land’s by Yankees overthrown.
 
Use every endeavour, and try to cause a peace,
For Yankee ships are building fast, their navy to increase.
They will enforce their commerce: their laws by Heaven were made,        35
That Yankee ships, in time of peace, to any port might trade.
 
Grant us free trade and commerce, don’t you impress our men;
Give up all claims to Canada, then we’ll make peace again.
Then, England, we’ll respect you, and treat you as a friend;
Respect our flag and citizens, then all these wars will end.        40
 
Our Rodgers, in the President, will burn, sink, and destroy,
The Congress, on the Brazil coast, your commerce will annoy.
The Essex, in the South Sea, will put out all your lights,
The flag she wears at mast-head, is “Free trade, and sailor’s rights.”
 
 
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