Verse > Anthologies > Hunt and Lee, eds. > The Book of the Sonnet
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Hunt and Lee, comps.  The Book of the Sonnet.  1867.
 
V. To Mrs. Sigourney
By James Dixon (1814–1873)
 
  With a “Forget-me-not” from the grave of KEATS, on whose tombstone are inscribed these words:—
“HERE LIES ONE WHOSE NAME WAS WRIT IN WATER.”

WANDERING in Rome, for thee a gift I sought:
Around me were the wonders of the past;
And modern Art, on every side, had cast
Her gems of richest beauty. Yet methought
These were scarce worthy thee. At length I stood,        5
One Sabbath eve, beside the grave of KEATS;
The turf was bright with flowers that gave their sweets
To the soft night-air, as in mournful mood:
Sad thoughts came o’er me, and I could have wept
That all the hopes that in the Poet’s heart,        10
As in a sanctuary, had been kept,
Could fade so soon, and perish, and depart;
  I plucked this flower for thee, the Muses’ happiest daughter,
  And joyed to think thy name should ne’er be “writ in water.”
 
 
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