Verse > Anthologies > Samuel Waddington, ed. > The Sonnets of Europe
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Samuel Waddington, comp.  The Sonnets of Europe.  1888.
 
The Human Comedy
By Tommaso Campanella (1568–1639)
 
Translated by John Addington Symonds

NATURE, by God directed, formed in space
  The universal comedy we see;
  Wherein each star, each man, each entity,
  Each living creature, hath its part and place;
And when the play is over, it shall be        5
  That God will judge with justice and with grace.—
  Aping this art divine, the human race
  Plans for itself on earth a comedy:
It makes kings, priests, slaves, heroes for the eyes
  Of vulgar folk; and gives them masks to play        10
  Their several parts—not wisely, as we see;
For impious men too oft we canonise,
  And kill the saints; while spurious lords array
  Their hosts against the real nobility.
 
 
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