Reference > Quotations > C.N. Douglas, comp. > Forty Thousand Quotations > Category Index
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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Quality
 
  Come, give us a taste of your quality.
Shakespeare.    
  1
  Quality, not quantity, is my measure.
Douglas Jerrold.    
  2
  The best is the cheapest.
Franklin.    
  3
  Nothing endures but personal qualities.
Walt Whitman.    
  4
  Innocence in genius, and candor in power, are both noble qualities.
Madame de Staël.    
  5
        That air and harmony of shape express,
Fine by degrees, and beautifully less.
Prior.    
  6
        The rank is but the guinea’s stamp,
The man’s the gowd for a’ that.
Burns.    
  7
  Things that have a common quality ever quickly seek their kind.
Marcus Aurelius.    
  8
  Judge not by the number, but by the weight.
Cicero.    
  9
  Be not dazzled by beauty, but look for those inward qualities which are lasting.
Seneca.    
  10
  Many individuals have, like uncut diamonds, shining qualities beneath a rough exterior.
Juvenal.    
  11
  You cannot judge by outward appearances; the soul is only transparent to its Maker.
Hosea Ballou.    
  12
  All her excellences stand in her so silently as if they had stolen upon her without her knowledge.
Sir T. Overbury.    
  13
  Wood burns because it has the proper stuff in it; and a man becomes famous because he has the proper stuff in him.
Goethe.    
  14
  Woman was formed to admire; man to be admirable. His are the glories of the sun at noonday; hers the softened splendors of the midnight moon.
Sir P. Sidney.    
  15
  Shining outward qualities, although they may excite first-rate expectations, are not unusually found to be the companions of second-rate abilities.
Colton.    
  16
  Beautiful to Ledyard, stiffening in the cold of a northern winter, seemed the diminutive, smoke-stained women of Lapland, who wrapped him in their furs, and ministered to his necessities with kindness and gentle words.
Whittier.    
  17
  A man or a woman may be highly irritable, and yet be sweet, tender, gentle, loving, sociable, kind, charitable, thoughtful for others, unselfish, generous.
Charles Buxton.    
  18
  It is the qualities of the heart, not those of the face, that should attract us in women, because the former are durable, the latter transitory. So lovable women, like roses, retain their sweetness long after they have lost their beauty.
Lamartine.    
  19
 
 
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