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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Marcus Antoninus
 
  Be simple and modest in your deportment, and treat with indifference whatever lies between virtue and vice. Love the human race; obey God.  1
  Can we wonder that men perish and are forgotten, when their noblest and most enduring works decay? Death comes even to monumental structures, and oblivion rests on the most illustrious names.  2
  Consider, for example, and you will find that almost all the transactions in the time of Vespasian differed little from those of the present day. You there find marrying and giving in marriage, educating children, sickness, death, war, joyous holidays, traffic, agriculture, flatterers, insolent pride, suspicions, laying of plots, longing for the death of others, newsmongers, lovers, misers, men canvassing for the consulship and for the kingdom; yet all these passed away, and are nowhere.  3
  Embellish the soul with simplicity, with prudence, and everything which is neither virtuous nor vicious. Love all men. Walk according to God; for, as a poet hath said, his laws govern all.  4
  Everything is mere opinion.  5
  Gluttony and drunkenness have two evils attendant on them; they make the carcass smart, as well as the pocket.  6
  God overrules all mutinous accidents, brings them under His laws of fate, and makes them all serviceable to His purpose.  7
  He that lives alone lives in danger; society avoids many dangers.  8
  In the same degree in which a man’s mind is nearer to freedom from all passion, in the same degree also is it nearer to strength.  9
  It were well to die if there be gods, and sad to live if there be none.  10
  Look well into thyself; there is a source which will always spring up if thou wilt always search them.  11
  Our understandings are always liable to error. Nature and certainty is very hard to come at; and infallibility is mere vanity and pretense.  12
  People generally despise where they flatter, and cringe to those they would gladly overtop; so that truth and ceremony are two things.  13
  Put it out of the power of truth to give you an ill character; and, if anybody reports you not to be an honest man, let your practice give him the lie; and to make all sure, you should resolve to live no longer than you can live honestly; for it is better to be nothing than a knave.  14
  Shun equally a sombre air and vivacious sallies.  15
  Such as are thy habitual thoughts, such also will be the character of thy mind; for the soul is dyed by the thoughts. Dye it then with a continuous series of such thoughts as these: that where a man can live, there he can also live well.  16
  The best sort of revenue is not to be like him who did the injury.  17
  The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts; therefore guard accordingly, and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue and reasonable nature.  18
  Truth and ceremony are two things.  19
  Whatever may happen to thee, it was prepared for thee from all eternity; and the implication of causes was from eternity spinning the thread of thy being and of that which is incident to it.  20
 
 
  Your disposition will be suitable to that which you most frequently think on; for the soul is, as it were, tinged with the color and complexion of its own thoughts.  21
 
 
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