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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
William Arthur
 
  A religion without the Holy Ghost, though it had all the ordinances and all the doctrines of the New Testament, would certainly not be Christianity.  1
  Human nature is said by many to be good; if so, where have social evils come from? For human nature is the only moral nature in that corrupting thing called “society.” Every example set before the child of to-day is the fruit of human nature. It has been planted on every possible field—among the snows that never melt; in temperate regions, and under the line; in crowded cities, in lonely forests; in ancient seats of civilization, in new colonies; and in all these fields it has, without once failing, brought forth a crop of sins and troubles.  2
  No glory of the Eternal One is higher than this, “Mighty to save;” no name of God is more adorable than that of “Saviour;” no place among the servants of God can be so glorious as that of an instrument of salvation.  3
  The regeneration of a sinner is an evidence of power in the highest sphere—moral nature; with the highest prerogative—to change nature; and operating to the highest result—not to create originally, which is great; but to create anew, which is greater.  4
  There is not a beast of the field but may trust his nature and follow it; certain that it will lead him to the best of which he is capable. But as for us, our only invincible enemy is our nature.  5
 
 
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